Parking  |  Tickets  |  Join

Cart

Heirloom Tomato Weekend
Heirloom Tomato Weekend
Heirloom Tomato Weekend
Heirloom Tomato Weekend
Heirloom Tomato Weekend
Heirloom Tomato Weekend

Tomato Talk : July 25

#CBGtomatotalk

Welcome to Tomato Talk, where we’ll talk tomatoes all season long.

Facebook link Ask us your questions on Facebook.

July 25: Diseases & Pests, Part 2

Know your pests & diseases

Know what pests and diseases look like to troubleshoot before they get in your garden beds. Want to plant disease-resistant varieties? Check out Cornell University's list of disease-resistant vegetable varieties.

Looking for specific recommendations for your tomato pests and diseases? Contact our Plant Information Service for a personal diagnosis and recommendations.

Tomato hornworm caterpillars—(and tobacco hornworm caterpillars)—can do considerable damage in just a day or two. They blend in so well that they often go unnoticed until the gardener discovers tomato stems stripped of their leaves. They tend to hide during the day and are active in the early morning and again at night. In spring, the first batch of hornworms complete their life cycle: they eat, pupate, and emerge as moths commonly called hawk, sphinx or hummingbird moths. A second generation of caterpillars drop off the plants and burrow into the soil, where they spend the winter as a brown pupa. They are best dealt with by picking them of by hand. (Otherwise, you could follow their life cycle into a beautiful hawkmoth butterfly.)

Tomato hornworm caterpillar

Tomato hornworm caterpillar

Hornworm caterpillar parasitized by braconid wasps

A parasitized caterpillar host bearing wasp cocoons

Mother Nature often helps out as well. Tiny parasitic braconid wasps lay their eggs in a hornworm. As they grow, the larvae eat the host caterpillar's insides and then burrow out of the caterpillar, creating fuzzy, white cocoons on its skin. If you notice a hornworm with white cocoons all over, place it on the ground. The eggs will hatch and eat the caterpillar—it’s nature’s free pest control.

Stink bug

Stink bug

Black flies, white flies, spider mites, and stink bugs can also pester plants. Check the leaves, stems, and fruits a few times a week to uncover pests before their populations explode. Fill a bucket with a few inches of soapy water (dish detergent will do) and bring it into the garden. Stink bugs and Japanese beetles tend to drop and hide when disturbed. Gently shaking the stems over the bucket will dislodge the pests.

Many garden centers offer yellow “sticky traps” to catch flying insects such as white flies. The traps can be placed around or between the plants. Healthy plants can often withstand occasional insect attacks. Continue to water, mulch, and weed for a harvest that lasts until September.

Aphids

Aphids

Aphids are slow-moving insects that are often found on the underside of leaves where they suck plant juices. A handful of the pests can quickly become hundreds covering leaves and stems. The insects can also spread cucumber mosaic virus, which causes mottled ferny foliage on tomato plants. A strong stream of water from the hose can wash them from the plants. Insecticidal soaps available at garden centers can also be used to control them.

Flea beetles damage tomato plants by eating tiny holes in leaves. They generally do not kill tomato plants, but may carry viruses from one tomato to another. Many gardeners plant mustard or radish near tomato crops to draw these pests away from their tomato plants.

Flea beetle damage to a leaf

Flea beetle damage to a leaf