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Plant Collections

Plant Collections
Plant Collections
Plant Collections
Plant Collections
Plant Collections
Plant Collections
Plant Collections
Plant Collections
Plant Collections

A museum's major function is to collect and preserve objects. As a museum, the Chicago Botanic Garden is dedicated to building its permanent collections, which are its objects. Living collections at the Chicago Botanic Garden focus on plants from around the world that grow well in the Chicago area and are adapted to the local climate and soils.

The Garden’s permanent plant collections cover 385 acres and currently hold more than 2.6 million living plants. These plants are of native and nonnative origin and are found in the Garden’s public terrestrial and aquatic displays. The current permanent Living Collection includes trees, shrubs, vines, hardy perennials, and tropical plants, for a total of 10,821 taxa. It is the quantity, diversity, and health of these taxa (or individual types of plants), along with documentation and public access, that determine the quality and importance of a collection.

Herbaceous perennials are the Chicago Botanic Garden’s largest and most extensive collection of plants. By definition, perennials continue to flower and fruit, year after year. Herbaceous perennials do not form woody tissue and normally die down at some period of the year in response to temperature, moisture, or light, and renew activity in the following growing season. At present, in total there are more than 2.4 million plants and propagules. The Chicago Botanic Garden has the largest collection of documented and labeled hardy herbaceous perennials on display in any public garden in North America. They range from 1-inch-tall thyme to 8-feet-tall compass plant (Silphium laciniatum) and are displayed as specimens, as groundcovers, in mixed borders, and integrated sweeps of thousands of plants.

The Chicago Botanic Garden’s woody plant collection is less diverse than arboreta (institutions specializing in woody plants) with large acreage, such as the Arnold, Holden, Morton, and National Arboretum. However, the Garden has one of the most extensive woody collections displayed in an ornamental garden setting, demonstrating landscape possibilities of any North American public garden. The Garden’s woody plant collection has a large percentage of cultivars compared to other public collections and the display and maintenance of these collections is recognized as one of the best.

The Garden has a great rose collection in the Krasberg Rose Garden and elsewhere. As many new varieties of disease-resistant and hardy roses are introduced, the best of these will be incorporated into the Garden’s collection. The Garden will not collect disease-prone, nonhardy hybrid teas, floribundas, grandifloras, etc., unless they are famous for historic, cultural, or horticultural reasons. The Garden has a rosarian adviser for the collection. 

For the benefit of the Garden’s audience, students, donors, and displays, the Garden has developed a plant collection of great variety. The acquisitions to the plant collection are intended to represent the best plants for Upper Midwest gardens and landscapes, as well as the many microenvironments in the greater Chicago region. These plants are the most disease resistant, hardy, and beautiful plants for people to incorporate into their lives. 

It is important that the plant collection is viewed as a museum living collection and not just landscape decoration. The collection is an important genetic repository of native species, unusual non-natives, and well-adapted cultivars that fare well in the Garden’s environment. As such, they are an important scientific resource for scholarly study, horticultural introduction, breeding efforts, verified references, and the Garden visitor.

National Collections

As a Plant Collections Network (PCN) member, the Garden is part of a North American consortium in which each garden agrees to conserve a certain segment of the plant population. Three genera at the Chicago Botanic Garden have been nationally accredited: Geranium, Quercus, and Spiraea. These plants were chosen because they provide an opportunity to address research issues; the Garden is already strong in these plants; there is sufficient curatorial support to acquire, develop, study, and disseminate information on these groups; they are adapted to the growing conditions of the Midwest; they are aesthetic; and they are relevant to the Garden's visitors and consumers.