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Pollinators


At the Garden, an array of colorful flowers are being pollinated by bees, butterflies, and hummingbirds.

Smart gardeners know that it's the presence of pollinators—the bees, butterflies, moths, beetles, flies, and other insects (plus hummingbirds)—that makes the difference in the health and fertility and productivity of wild plants, food plants, and landscape plants alike. Not only do plants depend on them, but our pollinator friends are responsible for 70 percent of the food we eat. Recent news about the die-off in honey bee colonies and the decline in monarch populations makes the issue of pollinator awareness an important one for all. 

How You Can Help Pollinators

Plant native pollinator plants.
Create nesting habitat.
Avoid using pesticides.
Support land conservation efforts.
Spread the word about pollinator declines.
Become a citizen scientist, join Budburst.

Attract Pollinators to Your Garden

Bees

Plants that attract bees:
Bayberry
Bee Balm
Big Blue Lobelia
Blackeyed Susan
Catmint
Foxtail Lily
Goldenrod
Jacob's Ladder
Joe-pye weed
Lavender
Purple Coneflower
Smooth Blue Aster
Smooth Beardtongue
Stonecrop
Sunflower

Butterflies

Plants that attract butterflies:
Beebalm
Black-eyed Susan
Blanket flower
Butterfly weed
Butterfly bush
Coneflower
Dill
Globe thistle
Gayfeather
Milkweed
Parsley
Red valerian
Tomatoes
Yarrow
Zinnia

Hummingbirds

Plants that attract hummingbirds:
Beebalm
Flowering Tobacco
Foxgloves
Fuchsia
Honeysuckle
Hyssop
Lantana
Lobelia
Morning glory
Red buckeye
Rhododendron
Salvia
Trumpet creeper
Verbena
Weigela