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The Swing of the Season

CLM Internship Blog - Fri, 08/19/2016 - 12:40pm

We are well into the swing of things here in Meeker. My feet are blistered from hiking (both for work and personal enjoyment), my pants have acquired permanent layers of dirt, and I have more freckles than I could possibly think to count. It’s turning out to be a very productive and fun field season. Fortunately, the juniper gnats have died down for the season, making some of our field days far more tolerable.

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My coworker and fellow CLM intern, Vanesa, enjoying the view on a hike to our plot.

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A collared lizard struttin’ its stuff

Time is truly flying by this season. I feel I can measure how long I’ve been here by how many plants I recognize when doing our vegetation monitoring. Every week, I recognize more and more specimens, which is a very empowering feeling. I like the idea of inching closer to truly understanding a place and all the diverse components that make up a functioning ecosystem. As the season wears on, it becomes more difficult to identify many annual plants, as many tend to dry out in the heat. And naturally, it is difficult to identify plants without diagnostic characteristics like flowers. Luckily, our mentor is a near-expert on the flora of Colorado, making it easy to learn. Of course, some days we observe aspects of dysfunction, like monocultures of the highly invasive cheatgrass (Bromus tectorum). Other invasive species like Alyssum desertorum and Lepidium perfoliatum are also extremely abundant on BLM land. Although our team does not do any work relating to eradicating or managing invasive species, it is my hope that the data we collect can help derive management plans for areas that are overrun by invasive annuals.

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A particularly beautiful Wyoming sage plot in Dinosaur National Monument.

A few highlights from this last month include seeing a flock on approximately 100 Pinyon Jays whilst on a grueling hike from our plot. One day we were able to go out in the field with a stream assessment crew to do aquatic invertebrate sampling. We also had the privilege of taking a riparian plant identification class this past week, taught by two highly knowledgeable botanists from Colorado State University. Although we predominately work in sagebrush and Pinyon-Juniper ecosystems, it was exciting to learn many riparian and wetland plants in Colorado, as wetlands are of the utmost importance for the overall health of the ecosystem.

Cheers,

Coryna Hebert

BLM, Meeker, CO

Deeply Rooted at the Regenstein Learning Campus

Youth Education - Fri, 08/19/2016 - 12:00pm

This September, find even more ways to learn, play, and get inspired. Our new Nature Play Garden’s plants and natural features encourage discovery, sensory interaction, and imaginative play.

But the best learning opportunities you’ll find on the Regenstein Learning Campus come from horticulturists and educators with lives deeply rooted in nature. Here are a few of their personal stories.

Explore the Nature Play Garden at the Learning Campus’s free Opening Celebration, September 10 & 11, from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. (parking fees apply). See the complete schedule for our Opening Celebration events on our website.

Kris Jarantoski

 Kris Jarantoski, age 3.

Kris at age 3.

 Kris Jarantoski, Executive Vice President and Director, Chicago Botanic Garden.

Kris Jarantoski, executive vice president and director, Chicago Botanic Garden

I grew up in a suburb of Milwaukee, Wisconsin. We lived across the street from a woods and river, and I played there all the time. With friends, we built forts and swung around on grapevines. I noticed that the hawthorn flower had a funky smell, and to this day, whenever I smell hawthorn flowers, I’m transported back to those woods.

My parents took me to visit Mitchell Park Conservatory and Boerner Botanical Gardens. Boerner Botanical Gardens especially made a huge impression on me. It had gardens on a scale that I did not have at home and a diversity of plants from around the world that could never fit into my yard. It expanded my horticultural horizons immensely and was a fantasy world to me.

I started out in college majoring in music, playing the organ. In my sophomore year I took a botany class and was fascinated. I switched my major to horticulture and loved designing and planning gardens. Once I decided to pursue a career in horticulture, I knew it had to be working in a botanic garden.

I got my dream job in 1977, when I started working at the Garden as an assistant horticulturist. Over the years I have been fortunate to work with talented staff to plan and plant 27 distinct display gardens and four natural areas.

Amy Kerr Wells

 Amy Wells as a child in her grandmother's garden.

Amy in her grandmother’s garden

 Amy Wells, Manager, Youth & Family Programs.

Amy Wells, manager, Youth & Family Programs

Here I am, at age 5, with my Grandma Kerr in her garden in Iowa, which we visited every summer. I loved her garden—she told me that she had a fairy living in her garden, and we would look for it as soon as we got there. Her flowers were big and tall—almost unreal to me as a youngster. Her magical touch in nature really stuck with me; her flowers were amazing, and I did not see them anywhere else.

I still carry that “garden magic” with me. I ask our camp teachers to have kids look for the magic in a seed, a tree, a pond—to take the time to just be in nature, whether that is listening to all the sounds in the Kleinman Family Cove, digging in the soil sandbox, chasing fireflies, or rolling down a hill—taking it all in—the sights, sounds, and smells.

Ann Halley

 Ann Halley as a child.

Ann helps in the backyard garden.

 Ann Halley, Coordinator, Early Childhood Programs.

Ann Halley, coordinator, Early Childhood Programs

My parents were born in Ireland, and, to hear them tell it, were outside every day. We lived on the west side of Chicago, and when I was 3 years old, my dad decided that we would put in a garden. I decided that he needed my help. We gardened, played under the sprinkler, jumped in puddles, and came home covered nearly head to toe in dirt just about every day.

The influence of being exposed to nature—the pretty and the messy—has very much influenced my life. Having this childhood, with parents who encouraged us to “live” outside every chance that we could, allowed me to value its importance and led me to teaching children how to learn in and through nature.

Julia McMahon

 Julia McMahon as a baby.

Julia as a toddler in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania

 Jullia McMahon, Coordinator, Family Programs.

Julia McMahon, coordinator, Family Programs

I grew up in suburban Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, with a landscaped front yard and a wooded backyard. I spent hours jumping from stone to stone in my mother’s rock garden, picking blueberries from bushes in our front yard before the birds gobbled them up, and “designing” and planting the annual bed along the walkway to our front door.

When I was 7 or 8 years old, my best friend and I were allowed to explore the woods by ourselves. One time we “discovered” a plant we called the umbrella plant. It was about 5 inches tall with horizontally held, fan-like branches covered in scale-like leaves. We excitedly brought it home and, although it didn’t last long, the impression did.

This exposure to nature and being allowed to explore outside on my own shaped many aspects of my life, including my decisions to study plant science at Cornell University and earn a master’s degree in elementary education at Loyola University Chicago. My position as family programs coordinator at the Chicago Botanic Garden combines my fondness for the natural world and my love of children and teaching. I look forward to teaching and sharing similar experiences with children at the new Regenstein Learning Campus.

Discover more about our deeply rooted scientists, educators, and horticulturists in our previous post, Deeply Rooted: Garden educators, scientists, and horticulturists are made early in life.

©2016 Chicago Botanic Garden and my.chicagobotanic.org

Deeply Rooted at the Regenstein Learning Campus

Garden Blog - Fri, 08/19/2016 - 12:00pm

This September, find even more ways to learn, play, and get inspired. Our new Nature Play Garden’s plants and natural features encourage discovery, sensory interaction, and imaginative play.

But the best learning opportunities you’ll find on the Regenstein Learning Campus come from horticulturists and educators with lives deeply rooted in nature. Here are a few of their personal stories.

Explore the Nature Play Garden at the Learning Campus’s free Opening Celebration, September 10 & 11, from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. (parking fees apply). See the complete schedule for our Opening Celebration events on our website.

Kris Jarantoski

 Kris Jarantoski, age 3.

Kris at age 3.

 Kris Jarantoski, Executive Vice President and Director, Chicago Botanic Garden.

Kris Jarantoski, executive vice president and director, Chicago Botanic Garden

I grew up in a suburb of Milwaukee, Wisconsin. We lived across the street from a woods and river, and I played there all the time. With friends, we built forts and swung around on grapevines. I noticed that the hawthorn flower had a funky smell, and to this day, whenever I smell hawthorn flowers, I’m transported back to those woods.

My parents took me to visit Mitchell Park Conservatory and Boerner Botanical Gardens. Boerner Botanical Gardens especially made a huge impression on me. It had gardens on a scale that I did not have at home and a diversity of plants from around the world that could never fit into my yard. It expanded my horticultural horizons immensely and was a fantasy world to me.

I started out in college majoring in music, playing the organ. In my sophomore year I took a botany class and was fascinated. I switched my major to horticulture and loved designing and planning gardens. Once I decided to pursue a career in horticulture, I knew it had to be working in a botanic garden.

I got my dream job in 1977, when I started working at the Garden as an assistant horticulturist. Over the years I have been fortunate to work with talented staff to plan and plant 27 distinct display gardens and four natural areas.

Amy Kerr Wells

 Amy Wells as a child in her grandmother's garden.

Amy in her grandmother’s garden

 Amy Wells, Manager, Youth & Family Programs.

Amy Wells, manager, Youth & Family Programs

Here I am, at age 5, with my Grandma Kerr in her garden in Iowa, which we visited every summer. I loved her garden—she told me that she had a fairy living in her garden, and we would look for it as soon as we got there. Her flowers were big and tall—almost unreal to me as a youngster. Her magical touch in nature really stuck with me; her flowers were amazing, and I did not see them anywhere else.

I still carry that “garden magic” with me. I ask our camp teachers to have kids look for the magic in a seed, a tree, a pond—to take the time to just be in nature, whether that is listening to all the sounds in the Kleinman Family Cove, digging in the soil sandbox, chasing fireflies, or rolling down a hill—taking it all in—the sights, sounds, and smells.

Ann Halley

 Ann Halley as a child.

Ann helps in the backyard garden.

 Ann Halley, Coordinator, Early Childhood Programs.

Ann Halley, coordinator, Early Childhood Programs

My parents were born in Ireland, and, to hear them tell it, were outside every day. We lived on the west side of Chicago, and when I was 3 years old, my dad decided that we would put in a garden. I decided that he needed my help. We gardened, played under the sprinkler, jumped in puddles, and came home covered nearly head to toe in dirt just about every day.

The influence of being exposed to nature—the pretty and the messy—has very much influenced my life. Having this childhood, with parents who encouraged us to “live” outside every chance that we could, allowed me to value its importance and led me to teaching children how to learn in and through nature.

Julia McMahon

 Julia McMahon as a baby.

Julia as a toddler in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania

 Jullia McMahon, Coordinator, Family Programs.

Julia McMahon, coordinator, Family Programs

I grew up in suburban Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, with a landscaped front yard and a wooded backyard. I spent hours jumping from stone to stone in my mother’s rock garden, picking blueberries from bushes in our front yard before the birds gobbled them up, and “designing” and planting the annual bed along the walkway to our front door.

When I was 7 or 8 years old, my best friend and I were allowed to explore the woods by ourselves. One time we “discovered” a plant we called the umbrella plant. It was about 5 inches tall with horizontally held, fan-like branches covered in scale-like leaves. We excitedly brought it home and, although it didn’t last long, the impression did.

This exposure to nature and being allowed to explore outside on my own shaped many aspects of my life, including my decisions to study plant science at Cornell University and earn a master’s degree in elementary education at Loyola University Chicago. My position as family programs coordinator at the Chicago Botanic Garden combines my fondness for the natural world and my love of children and teaching. I look forward to teaching and sharing similar experiences with children at the new Regenstein Learning Campus.

Discover more about our deeply rooted scientists, educators, and horticulturists in our previous post, Deeply Rooted: Garden educators, scientists, and horticulturists are made early in life.

©2016 Chicago Botanic Garden and my.chicagobotanic.org

Catalogue.

New Book Arrivals - Fri, 08/19/2016 - 9:35am
Catalogue.
Author: E. Weyhe, Inc.

Catalogue / Bernard Quaritch Ltd.

New Book Arrivals - Fri, 08/19/2016 - 9:35am
Catalogue / Bernard Quaritch Ltd.
Author: Bernard Quaritch (Firm)

Catalogue.

New Book Arrivals - Fri, 08/19/2016 - 9:35am
Catalogue.
Author: Export Book Co.

Catalogue.

New Book Arrivals - Fri, 08/19/2016 - 9:35am
Catalogue.
Author: Antiquariaat Meijer Elte.

Catalogue / Colin and Charlotte Franklin.

New Book Arrivals - Fri, 08/19/2016 - 9:35am
Catalogue / Colin and Charlotte Franklin.
Author: Colin and Charlotte Franklin (Firm)

Catalogue.

New Book Arrivals - Fri, 08/19/2016 - 9:35am
Catalogue.
Author: Staack (Firm)

Catalogue.

New Book Arrivals - Fri, 08/19/2016 - 9:35am
Catalogue.
Author: Charles W. Traylen (Firm)

Catalogue.

New Book Arrivals - Fri, 08/19/2016 - 9:35am
Catalogue.
Author: Henry George Fiedler (Firm)

Catalogue.

New Book Arrivals - Fri, 08/19/2016 - 9:35am
Catalogue.
Author: Eric Lundberg (Firm)

Princess persimmon / Yasuhisa Yamaguchi.

New Book Arrivals - Fri, 08/19/2016 - 9:35am
Princess persimmon / Yasuhisa Yamaguchi.
Author: Yamaguchi, Yasuhisa, author.
Call Number: SB379.P4Y36 2010

Pests of landscape trees and shrubs : an integrated pest management guide / UC Statewide Integrated Pest Management Program ; Steve H. Dreistadt, writer ; Jack Kelly Clark, principal photographer ; Tunyalee A. Martin, content supervisor ; Mary Louise...

New Book Arrivals - Fri, 08/19/2016 - 9:35am
Pests of landscape trees and shrubs : an integrated pest management guide / UC Statewide Integrated Pest Management Program ; Steve H. Dreistadt, writer ; Jack Kelly Clark, principal photographer ; Tunyalee A. Martin, content supervisor ; Mary Louise Flint, technical editor.
Author: Dreistadt, Steve H., author.
Call Number: SB763.C2D74 2016

Vegetation dynamics : a synthesis of plant ecophysiology, remote sensing and modelling / Derek Eamus, University of Technology, Sydney, Alfredo Huete, University of Technology, Sydney, Qiang Yu, University of Technology, Sydney.

New Book Arrivals - Fri, 08/19/2016 - 9:35am
Vegetation dynamics : a synthesis of plant ecophysiology, remote sensing and modelling / Derek Eamus, University of Technology, Sydney, Alfredo Huete, University of Technology, Sydney, Qiang Yu, University of Technology, Sydney.
Author: Eamus, Derek, author.
Call Number: QK717.E16 2016

Tropical fruits and other edible plants of the world : an illustrated guide / Rolf Blancke.

New Book Arrivals - Fri, 08/19/2016 - 9:35am
Tropical fruits and other edible plants of the world : an illustrated guide / Rolf Blancke.
Author: Blancke, Rolf, author.
Call Number: SB359.B53 2016

Most beautiful gardens ever written : a guide / Jane Gillette.

New Book Arrivals - Fri, 08/19/2016 - 9:35am
Most beautiful gardens ever written : a guide / Jane Gillette.
Author: Gillette, Jane Brown, author.
Call Number: PN6071.G27G55 2016

Restoring heritage grains : the culture, diversity, resilience, and cuisine of ancient wheats / Eli Rogosa.

New Book Arrivals - Fri, 08/19/2016 - 9:35am
Restoring heritage grains : the culture, diversity, resilience, and cuisine of ancient wheats / Eli Rogosa.
Author: Rogosa, Eli, 1952- author.
Call Number: SB191.W5R64 2016

Wisps of mist / Gwen Frostic.

New Book Arrivals - Fri, 08/19/2016 - 9:35am
Wisps of mist / Gwen Frostic.
Author: Frostic, Gwen, author, illustrator.
Call Number: PS3556.R66W57 1969

Beyond time / Gwen Frostic.

New Book Arrivals - Fri, 08/19/2016 - 9:35am
Beyond time / Gwen Frostic.
Author: Frostic, Gwen, author, illustrator.
Call Number: PS3556.R66B49 1971

Pages

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