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The language of flowers, ancient and modern / Mary K. Moulton, editor & compiler.

New Book Arrivals - Sat, 01/27/2018 - 12:00am
The language of flowers, ancient and modern / Mary K. Moulton, editor & compiler.
Author: Moulton, Mary K..
Call Number: QK84.M6 1962

Language of flowers / illustrated by Kate Greenaway.

New Book Arrivals - Sat, 01/27/2018 - 12:00am
Language of flowers / illustrated by Kate Greenaway.
Author: Greenaway, Kate, 1846-1901.
Call Number: GR780.G72 1899

Emblems and poetry of flowers.

New Book Arrivals - Sat, 01/27/2018 - 12:00am
Emblems and poetry of flowers.
Call Number: PN6110.F6E43 1857

The poetry of flowers : original and selected. [Four lines from Pope] / Edited by Rufus W. Griswold.

New Book Arrivals - Sat, 01/27/2018 - 12:00am
The poetry of flowers : original and selected. [Four lines from Pope] / Edited by Rufus W. Griswold.
Author: Griswold, Rufus W. (Rufus Wilmot), 1815-1857, editor.
Call Number: PN6110.F6G75 1846

Floral gems, or, The songs of the flowers / By Mrs. J. Thayer, author of "The vacation," "Passion," etc. : [Two lines of verse].

New Book Arrivals - Sat, 01/27/2018 - 12:00am
Floral gems, or, The songs of the flowers / By Mrs. J. Thayer, author of "The vacation," "Passion," etc. : [Two lines of verse].
Author: Thayer, J., Mrs.
Call Number: PN6110.F6T4 1847

Newfields : a place for nature & the arts

New Book Arrivals - Sat, 01/27/2018 - 12:00am
Newfields : a place for nature & the arts
Call Number: N577.N48 2017

Flowers of the field / by the Rev. C.A. Johns, B.A., F.L.S., revised throughout and edited by Clarence Elliott . With 92 coloured illustrations by E.N. Gwatkin and 245 cuts in the text.

New Book Arrivals - Tue, 01/23/2018 - 9:00pm
Flowers of the field / by the Rev. C.A. Johns, B.A., F.L.S., revised throughout and edited by Clarence Elliott . With 92 coloured illustrations by E.N. Gwatkin and 245 cuts in the text.
Author: Johns, C. A. (Charles Alexander), 1811-1871.
Call Number: QK306.J7 1908

Album des orchidées d'Europe / Henry Correvon.

New Book Arrivals - Tue, 01/23/2018 - 9:00pm
Album des orchidées d'Europe / Henry Correvon.
Author: Correvon, Henry, 1854-1939.
Call Number: QK495.O64C677 1923

Home gardening for school children 1922 / John Lewis Childs, Inc.

New Book Arrivals - Tue, 01/23/2018 - 9:00pm
Home gardening for school children 1922 / John Lewis Childs, Inc.
Author: John Lewis Childs (Firm)
Call Number: SB115.J646 1922

Gardening for children / edited by C.A. Johns.

New Book Arrivals - Tue, 01/23/2018 - 9:00pm
Gardening for children / edited by C.A. Johns.
Author: Johns, C. A. (Charles Alexander), 1811-1874.
Call Number: SB457.J63 1849

The language and poetry of flowers, and poetic handbook of wedding anniversary pieces, album verses, and valentines, together with a great number of beautiful poetical quotations from famous authors.

New Book Arrivals - Mon, 01/22/2018 - 9:00pm
The language and poetry of flowers, and poetic handbook of wedding anniversary pieces, album verses, and valentines, together with a great number of beautiful poetical quotations from famous authors.
Call Number: PN6110.F6L34 1912

The language and poetry of flowers, and poetic handbook of wedding anniversary pieces, album verses and valentines. / Together with a great number of beautiful poetical quotations from famous authors.

New Book Arrivals - Mon, 01/22/2018 - 9:00pm
The language and poetry of flowers, and poetic handbook of wedding anniversary pieces, album verses and valentines. / Together with a great number of beautiful poetical quotations from famous authors.
Call Number: PN6110.F6L343

Astilbes / S. Ievina.

New Book Arrivals - Mon, 01/22/2018 - 9:00pm
Astilbes / S. Ievina.
Author: Ievin̦a, S.
Call Number: SB413.A74I34 1969

Redkie i ischezai︠u︡shchie vidy prirodnoĭ flory SSSR, kulʹtiviruemye v botanicheskikh sadakh i drugikh introdukt︠s︡ionnykh t︠s︡entrakh strany / [redakt︠s︡ionnai︠a︡ kollegii︠a︡ P.I. Lapin (otvetstvennyĭ redaktor) and others].

New Book Arrivals - Mon, 01/22/2018 - 9:00pm
Redkie i ischezai︠u︡shchie vidy prirodnoĭ flory SSSR, kulʹtiviruemye v botanicheskikh sadakh i drugikh introdukt︠s︡ionnykh t︠s︡entrakh strany / [redakt︠s︡ionnai︠a︡ kollegii︠a︡ P.I. Lapin (otvetstvennyĭ redaktor) and others].
Call Number: QK86.S65R45 1983

The Mediterranean region : biological diversity in space and time / Jacques Blondel [and others] ; with the assistance of Christelle Fontaine.

New Book Arrivals - Mon, 01/22/2018 - 9:00pm
The Mediterranean region : biological diversity in space and time / Jacques Blondel [and others] ; with the assistance of Christelle Fontaine.
Call Number: QH150.M46 2010

Snow sisters! / Kerri Kokias, Teagan White.

New Book Arrivals - Mon, 01/22/2018 - 9:00pm
Snow sisters! / Kerri Kokias, Teagan White.
Author: Kokias, Kerri, author.
Call Number: PZ7.1.K65Sn 2018

An abundance of flowers : more great flower breeders of the past / Judith M. Taylor.

New Book Arrivals - Mon, 01/22/2018 - 9:00pm
An abundance of flowers : more great flower breeders of the past / Judith M. Taylor.
Author: Taylor, Judith M., author.
Call Number: SB406.8.T395 2018

Pinecone Birdfeeders

Birding Events at the Forest Preserves - Sat, 01/20/2018 - 10:00am

Join University of Illinois Master Gardeners for a make-and-take activity that feeds our feathered friends during the cold winter months!

The post Pinecone Birdfeeders appeared first on Forest Preserves of Cook County.

Does This Houseplant Make Me Look Like an Adult?

Garden Blog - Wed, 01/17/2018 - 11:44am

Hi, my name is Erica. I’m a bad plant parent.

The irony that I work at the Chicago Botanic Garden is not lost on me. (Please don’t fire me, plant bosses.) The problem is, I have no idea how to take care of plants. Not really.

erica-plant-parenthood

Walk into my apartment and tell me what you see: A wasteland of unsuspecting money trees and innocent spiderworts. A drooping pothos in the corner, desperate for water. Squeezing the life out of my little green pals does not bring me joy. And yet, here I am, a lone wolf among my jungalow-dwelling, millennial peers: A plant-killer.

Raise your hand if you’ve ever asked these questions: Does my monstera prefer direct sun? Will an aloe vera kill my cat? What if I get too caught up in my very important plans (read: binging Mindhunter on Netflix) that I forget to water my fern every day? Why would I even want a plant? (More on that later).

One of my goals is to have more life in my home; to lay down some roots, so to speak (plant-pun intended). And so I invite you to follow along with me as I chronicle my gardening adventures in Plant Parenthood—a blog series about growing a relationship with plants.

With the Garden’s horticulture staff as my guide, I’ll learn the ins and outs of soil, pests, and shade. I’ll make mistakes. I’ll definitely kill more plants.

But along the way, I’ll learn something. And I hope you will, too.

One thing I’ve learned so far is I’m not the only young person new to gardening. The 2016 National Gardening Report found of the six million Americans new to gardening, five million of them were 18- to 34-year-olds. Millennials, according to a widely shared Washington Post article last year, are gardening indoors because they’ve moved to small, urban apartments and crave nature. Look no further than Instagram to see the evidence: hashtags like #urbanjungle and #jungalow call up all sorts of gauzy photos of apartments brimming with foliage.

What’s more: These plant parents seem genuinely proud to show off their blossoming, plant-baby families. How do they do it, I wonder? Where is a recovering plant-ignoramus to start?

I went to Fred Spicer for advice. As executive vice president and director of the Garden, he understands plants. Plus, he wears a gardening hat eighty percent of the time, so I figure he must know something.

fred-spicerTurns out “plant blindness”—or the inability to notice, appreciate, and understand plants—is a common problem among humans. The term was coined in 1998 by botanist-educators James Wandersee and Elizabeth Schussler, who argued humans generally connect more with animals, despite the fact that plants fuel all life on Earth. Think back to grade school science class, when you first learned about photosynthesis and plant biology. Have you thought much about it since? I began to worry about the imbalance of affection toward my cat versus my definitely dead lemon cypress.

“Humans generally don’t think too much about plants, unless we’re eating them,” said Spicer. “We’re animals, our pets are animals, we generally know what animals want. Plants are different. They don’t have the same biology we do. So they’re mysterious to us.”

For instance, plants aren’t active, at least not in the way animals are active. Their activity happens on a different timeline than ours. Humans pay attention to big and rapid changes, like when the leaves change during the fall, or when trees are bare in winter. But the small things, like a budding leaf, we don’t always stop to notice.

Okay, so plants aren’t animals. How, then, do I begin to understand them?

Here’s what Spicer recommends:

Three things every new #PlantParent should ask:
  1. Light – No houseplant lives in the dark. Spicer asks whether your living space is plant hospitable: Do you have natural light? Are there places in your home that get more direct/indirect light? If not, are you open to artificial lighting, like grow lamps?
  2. Maintenance – How much do you want to interact with your plants? “Do you want to fuss with them every day? Do you want to be able to leave them for a week? Some plants need more attention than others,” said Spicer. Be realistic about how much time and energy you can spend.
  3. PurposeWhat do you want to get out of your plants? Spicer asks: “Do you want to eat them? Do you want to see flowers? Do you want to create a particular design aesthetic?” Knowing your goals can help you pick the right plants.

As I sit with these questions, I think about a plant I picked up from the Garden last week. It was an azalea, a small shrub with white flowers that look like snowflakes. Left over from a recent exhibition, it most likely would die within a week, but nevertheless as I placed it in the backseat of my car to take it home, I caught myself reaching for the seat belt. I almost buckled it in. Maybe plant parenthood won’t be so unnatural after all.

 

Green roofs grow up: Creating native prairies in city skylines

Plant Science and Conservation - Wed, 01/17/2018 - 9:44am

Pop quiz: What kind of natural habitat is increasing in urban areas? This is not a trick question. Rather, the answer offers a slice of good news on a planet that has been increasingly turning from green to gray.

Green roofs are on the rise in cities, according to Kelly Ksiazek-Mikenas, Ph.D., who has a newly minted doctorate degree from the Chicago Botanic Garden and Northwestern University’s graduate program in plant biology and conservation. In Illinois, where more than 99 percent of native prairie has been lost since the 1800s, this is especially good news. 

Kelly Ksiazek-Mikenas in the Plant Science Lab

Kelly Ksiazek-Mikenas, Ph.D., in the Plant Science Lab

Dr. Ksiazek-Mikenas, a former biology teacher, spent six years studying these engineered habitats and their potential to support biodiversity.

The plant scientist is now eager to share her findings: When started carefully and with a long-term plan in mind, these sites do grow up to support species, natural communities, and genetic diversity.

“When you have these three pieces working, you have a good foundation that should sustain plant life over long periods of time and live through environmental changes, and that look and function like a diverse prairie,” she said.

Dr. Ksiazek-Mikenas examined shallow (up to six inches of soil depth), low-moisture roofs from Glencoe, Illinois, to Neubrandenburg, Germany, before reaching that conclusion. While the roofs within the United States are generally younger, some in her German sites were up to 93 years old, providing a mix of data about green roofs at all ages. She also studied data sets and conducted shorter-term experiments to clarify the qualities green roofs need to succeed.

Setting up insect traps in 2013 on a green roof on top of the Berliner Wasserbetriebe building in downtown Berlin

Dr. Ksiazek-Mikenas sets up insect traps in 2013 on a green roof in downtown Berlin.

Her work had its ups and downs. She arrived in Germany looking for similarities, expecting the insect and plant species on one roof to mirror that on the others. Rather, she found differences between roof gardens. After a deep dive into data, she found the secret. Although the plant species differed between gardens, those that grew well shared the traits of being stress-tolerant and adept at establishing themselves in new areas.

She was concerned by the lack of diversity on individual roof gardens both in Germany and in her study sites in Chicago.

Back at the Chicago Botanic Garden, she set up an experiment to test how different soil types would affect which plants were successful, and whether she could create a more diverse community on one rooftop by planting both rock and sand prairies.

She planted her experimental plots on the Josephine P. & John J. Louis Foundation Green Roof Garden North on the Daniel F. and Ada L. Rice Plant Conservation Science Center and monitored activity over three years. She found success in growing a more diverse habitat. In related work at the same site, she confirmed that native plantings, rather than the common sedum plant mix used on roof tops, offered benefits similar to a native prairie when it comes to storing rainwater, for example.

The Plant Science Center’s Green Roof Garden is an important resource. Planted in 2009, it serves as a living laboratory, classroom, research site, and a source of inspiration to visitors.

The north side of the green roof of the Chicago Botanic Garden Plant Science Center in 2015, including a blooming population Penstemon hirsutus used in one of Dr. Ksiazek-Mikenas' experiments

A blooming population of Penstemon hirsutus was part of  Dr. Ksiazek-Mikenas’ experiments.

She then expanded to include plots on the Ellis Goodman Family Foundation Green Roof Garden South to study genetic diversity. She compared the genetic diversity of populations established from nursery stock to natural populations, finding more diversity in the natural populations grown from wild collected seed.

On the heels of that finding, she studied populations on green roofs in Chicago near Lake Michigan to find out if the plants were able to share their genetic material with plants on neighboring roofs through pollination. She was thrilled to confirm that they did, as the exchange of diverse genetic material is essential for the long-term health of a species.

Although there are limitations to green roof gardens, mainly due to the lack of soil depth and disconnected setting, Dr. Ksiazek-Mikenas is optimistic about their ability to sustain native species. She has presented her work at numerous conferences across the globe to academics and those in the landscaping industry.

Two prairie species in Dr. Ksiazek-Mikenas' experimental plots blooming on a green roof on the Peggy Notebaert Nature Museum in Chicago

Two prairie species in Dr. Ksiazek-Mikenas’ experimental plots—Ratibida pinnata (foreground, right) and Lespedeza capitata (background, left)—bloom on a green roof on the Peggy Notebaert Nature Museum in Chicago.

“In the future, I hope that green roofs can continue to provide ecosystem services to people but also increasingly support a wide variety of urban biodiversity,” she said.

The motivated researcher is ready to move ahead with her career and intends to continue to bring her unique perspective to future students and to the development of more green infrastructure in this growing world.

©2018 Chicago Botanic Garden and my.chicagobotanic.org

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