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Album de orchidáceas brasileiras e o Orchidário do estado de S. Paulo (com 58 estampas em cores naturaes e 109 clichés escuros) por F.C. Hoehne, diretor do mesmo e chefe da Secção de Botánica e Agronomia do Instituto Biológico.

New Book Arrivals - Wed, 04/11/2018 - 2:00pm
Album de orchidáceas brasileiras e o Orchidário do estado de S. Paulo (com 58 estampas em cores naturaes e 109 clichés escuros) por F.C. Hoehne, diretor do mesmo e chefe da Secção de Botánica e Agronomia do Instituto Biológico.
Author: Hoehne, F. C. (Frederico Carlos), 1882-1959.
Call Number: QK495.O64H64 1930

Forget me not : Emblem of True Love.

New Book Arrivals - Tue, 04/10/2018 - 1:00pm
Forget me not : Emblem of True Love.
Call Number: Postcard 34

Rose : Emblem of Fond Love

New Book Arrivals - Tue, 04/10/2018 - 1:00pm
Rose : Emblem of Fond Love
Call Number: Postcard 32

With every kind thought

New Book Arrivals - Tue, 04/10/2018 - 1:00pm
With every kind thought
Call Number: Postcard 31

Violet : Emblem of Faithfulness.

New Book Arrivals - Tue, 04/10/2018 - 1:00pm
Violet : Emblem of Faithfulness.
Call Number: Postcard 33

Trillium: Conserving a Native Wildflower

Plant Science and Conservation - Tue, 04/10/2018 - 10:55am

When spring unfurls, the trillium are among the stars of the native wildflowers—and in coming years, the show at the Chicago Botanic Garden will be even more spectacular.

A ground-level view of forest trilliums in spring bloom

A ground-level view of forest trilliums in spring bloom

White trillium (Trillium grandiflorum)

White trillium (Trillium grandiflorum)

Little sweet Betsy (Trillium cuneatum)

Little sweet Betsy (Trillium cuneatum)

Yellow wakerobin (Trillium luteum)

Yellow wakerobin (Trillium luteum)

The Chicago Botanic Garden is collaborating with the Huntsville Botanical Garden in Alabama on a Trillium conservation program for the beloved woodland flower. The Huntsville Botanical Garden has one of the most complete collections of Trillium in the United States. In April, Andrew Bunting, assistant director of the Chicago Botanic Garden and director of plant collections, will pick up carefully selected rhizomes, or underground horizontal stems, from Huntsville’s collection.

Biota of North America Program (BONAP) map of Trillium in the United States

Biota of North America Program (BONAP) map of Trillium in the United States

When he returns, the rhizomes will be grown out in the nursery, and in two to three years, the Trillium plants will be replanted in areas to be determined throughout the Garden. 

Currently, the Chicago Botanic Garden has eight species of Trillium growing in the McDonald Woods, the Sensory Garden, the Native Plant Garden, and Lakeside Garden. If all goes well, the Huntsville transplants will bring dozens of more taxa, or individual types of plants, to the Garden. 

When we began our collaboration with Huntsville, we catalogued each of its Trillium species to evaluate which ones from its collection might grow in our limestone-based soils and USDA Zone 5 growing conditions. Typically, the species likes the rich, acid soils and deep shade of the ancient eastern forests. But there are several species that thrive in the more alkaline soils across the Midwest. Our goal is to expand the range of growing areas for some species and increase the overall diversity.   

Trillium plant parts illustration.

Trillium plant parts illustration from Trillium, by Fredrick W. Case and Roberta Case, Timber Press, Portland, Oregon, 1997.

Urban growth and development over the years has cleared the forests in many of the natural habitats of the species. Some species, like Trillium persistens, are extremely rare and considered endangered. Trillium are so beloved that they have appeared on two U.S. Postal Service stamps.

Come for an early spring walk to look for trillium and other wildflowers in the McDonald Woods. Or join a free guided McDonald Woods wildflower walk at 1 p.m. on Saturday, April 21, as part of the Garden’s new Unearth Science festival.

Marcia Glenn

Marcia Glenn volunteers with Andrew Bunting and the Plant Collections team, and Lisa Hilgenberg in the Regenstein Fruit & Vegetable Garden. She has more than 30 years of experience in agriculture, international trade, government policy, and management, and has served on several boards. She has a bachelor’s degree and master’s degree in agricultural economics and is a master gardener.

Marcia Glenn volunteers with Andrew Bunting and the Plant Collections team, and Lisa Hilgenberg in the Regenstein Fruit and Vegetable Garden. She has over 30 years of experience in agriculture, international trade, government policy, and management and has served on several Boards. She has a BS and MS in Agricultural Economics and is a Master Gardener. Her experience is being put to good use at the Gardens these days!

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Photos by Huntsville Botanical Garden
©2018 Chicago Botanic Garden and my.chicagobotanic.org

Trillium: Conserving a Native Wildflower

Garden Blog - Tue, 04/10/2018 - 10:55am

When spring unfurls, the trillium are among the stars of the native wildflowers—and in coming years, the show at the Chicago Botanic Garden will be even more spectacular.

A ground-level view of forest trilliums in spring bloom

A ground-level view of forest trilliums in spring bloom

White trillium (Trillium grandiflorum)

White trillium (Trillium grandiflorum)

Little sweet Betsy (Trillium cuneatum)

Little sweet Betsy (Trillium cuneatum)

Yellow wakerobin (Trillium luteum)

Yellow wakerobin (Trillium luteum)

The Chicago Botanic Garden is collaborating with the Huntsville Botanical Garden in Alabama on a Trillium conservation program for the beloved woodland flower. The Huntsville Botanical Garden has one of the most complete collections of Trillium in the United States. In April, Andrew Bunting, assistant director of the Chicago Botanic Garden and director of plant collections, will pick up carefully selected rhizomes, or underground horizontal stems, from Huntsville’s collection.

Biota of North America Program (BONAP) map of Trillium in the United States

Biota of North America Program (BONAP) map of Trillium in the United States

When he returns, the rhizomes will be grown out in the nursery, and in two to three years, the Trillium plants will be replanted in areas to be determined throughout the Garden. 

Currently, the Chicago Botanic Garden has eight species of Trillium growing in the McDonald Woods, the Sensory Garden, the Native Plant Garden, and Lakeside Garden. If all goes well, the Huntsville transplants will bring dozens of more taxa, or individual types of plants, to the Garden. 

When we began our collaboration with Huntsville, we catalogued each of its Trillium species to evaluate which ones from its collection might grow in our limestone-based soils and USDA Zone 5 growing conditions. Typically, the species likes the rich, acid soils and deep shade of the ancient eastern forests. But there are several species that thrive in the more alkaline soils across the Midwest. Our goal is to expand the range of growing areas for some species and increase the overall diversity.   

Trillium plant parts illustration.

Trillium plant parts illustration from Trillium, by Fredrick W. Case and Roberta Case, Timber Press, Portland, Oregon, 1997.

Urban growth and development over the years has cleared the forests in many of the natural habitats of the species. Some species, like Trillium persistens, are extremely rare and considered endangered. Trillium are so beloved that they have appeared on two U.S. Postal Service stamps.

Come for an early spring walk to look for trillium and other wildflowers in the McDonald Woods. Or join a free guided McDonald Woods wildflower walk at 1 p.m. on Saturday, April 21, as part of the Garden’s new Unearth Science festival.

Marcia Glenn

Marcia Glenn volunteers with Andrew Bunting and the Plant Collections team, and Lisa Hilgenberg in the Regenstein Fruit & Vegetable Garden. She has more than 30 years of experience in agriculture, international trade, government policy, and management, and has served on several boards. She has a bachelor’s degree and master’s degree in agricultural economics and is a master gardener.

Marcia Glenn volunteers with Andrew Bunting and the Plant Collections team, and Lisa Hilgenberg in the Regenstein Fruit and Vegetable Garden. She has over 30 years of experience in agriculture, international trade, government policy, and management and has served on several Boards. She has a BS and MS in Agricultural Economics and is a Master Gardener. Her experience is being put to good use at the Gardens these days!

-->

Photos by Huntsville Botanical Garden
©2018 Chicago Botanic Garden and my.chicagobotanic.org

Tuesday Mornings are for the Birds

Birding Events at the Forest Preserves - Tue, 04/10/2018 - 8:00am

Bring your binoculars and enjoy the spring migration. We’ll visit Sand Ridge’s best birding spots and watch for some colorful warblers.

The post Tuesday Mornings are for the Birds appeared first on Forest Preserves of Cook County.

The orchid hunter : a young botanist's search for happiness / Leif Bersweden.

New Book Arrivals - Mon, 04/09/2018 - 12:00pm
The orchid hunter : a young botanist's search for happiness / Leif Bersweden.
Author: Bersweden, Leif, author.
Call Number: QK495.O64B48 2017

The garden in every sense and season / Tovah Martin ; photographs by Kindra Clineff.

New Book Arrivals - Mon, 04/09/2018 - 12:00pm
The garden in every sense and season / Tovah Martin ; photographs by Kindra Clineff.
Author: Martin, Tovah, author.
Call Number: SB318.3.M37 2018

Texas wildflowers : a field guide / Campbell and Lynn Loughmiller ; updated by Joe Marcus, Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center ; foreword to the first edition by Lady Bird Johnson.

New Book Arrivals - Mon, 04/09/2018 - 12:00pm
Texas wildflowers : a field guide / Campbell and Lynn Loughmiller ; updated by Joe Marcus, Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center ; foreword to the first edition by Lady Bird Johnson.
Author: Loughmiller, Campbell, author.
Call Number: QK188.L68 2018

Why don't we go into the garden? : the care culture handbook : how to ensure your residents enjoy their garden all year round / Debbie Carroll, Mark Rendell.

New Book Arrivals - Mon, 04/09/2018 - 12:00pm
Why don't we go into the garden? : the care culture handbook : how to ensure your residents enjoy their garden all year round / Debbie Carroll, Mark Rendell.
Author: Carroll, Debbie (Garden designer), author.
Call Number: RM735.7.G37C37 2016

Sarah P. Duke Gardens

New Book Arrivals - Mon, 04/09/2018 - 12:00pm
Sarah P. Duke Gardens
Call Number: QK73.U62S27 2014

Prime Real Estate

Birding Events at the Forest Preserves - Sun, 04/08/2018 - 1:00pm

See why and how we provide cavity nesting birds with accommodations, then stay to see the tree swallows compete.

The post Prime Real Estate appeared first on Forest Preserves of Cook County.

Sagawau Bird Hikes

Birding Events at the Forest Preserves - Sun, 04/08/2018 - 8:30am

Join a naturalist to observe birds. Learn to identify birds by field marks, behavior, sound and habitat. Binoculars available for loan.

The post Sagawau Bird Hikes appeared first on Forest Preserves of Cook County.

An island garden / by Celia Thaxter, with pictures and illuminations by Childe Hassam.

New Book Arrivals - Sat, 04/07/2018 - 10:00am
An island garden / by Celia Thaxter, with pictures and illuminations by Childe Hassam.
Author: Thaxter, Celia, 1835-1894.
Call Number: SB466.U7T6 1895

Bird Walk

Birding Events at the Forest Preserves - Sat, 04/07/2018 - 7:30am

A morning bird walk. Meet at Picnic Grove #1.

The post Bird Walk appeared first on Forest Preserves of Cook County.

Palos Waterfowl Trip

Birding Events at the Forest Preserves - Sat, 04/07/2018 - 7:30am

Look for returning waterfowl. Beginning birders welcome; binoculars available. Updates: chicagobirder.org.

The post Palos Waterfowl Trip appeared first on Forest Preserves of Cook County.

Bog Sucker Hunt

Birding Events at the Forest Preserves - Fri, 04/06/2018 - 7:00pm

Start inside with a short intro, then take a walk to observe the male woodcock spiraling upward in the darkening sky, then tumbling back down. Ages 7 & up.

Learn more about the male woodcock’s mating flight

The post Bog Sucker Hunt appeared first on Forest Preserves of Cook County.

The Power of Plants: Botanical Weightlifters

Youth Education - Fri, 04/06/2018 - 9:48am

There are things I look forward to seeing every season.

In spring, I watch for “mighty plants” that emerge from the ground with enough force to heave the soil above ground. These botanical weightlifters—the bulbs, grasses, and other emergent plants—pushing up soil that was compressed by a blanket of snow never fail to impress me. I am in awe of the strength of plants. 

 Daffodil leaves have pushed through the mulch, lifting it off the ground.

Daffodil leaves erupted from the ground in March and lifted the mulch in the beds around the Regenstein Learning Campus.

Seeing bulbs coming up all around me inspires lots of questions. I want to understand how this is possible and I want to test their strength. So I spent a few weeks playing around with this phenomenon in the Learning Center’s Boeing Nature Laboratory. 

To begin, I wanted to demonstrate that seeds will lift soil in a pot. I soaked bunch of wheat seeds overnight and planted them in a pot. I covered them with a generous amount of potting soil (about a 1/2-inch layer) and I tamped the soil down gently so that it would be compressed—like the topsoil might be after a winter of snow cover. Three days later, I had results! I sprayed the soil disk to give it a little adhesion, so I could see how long it would hold together as the grass lifted it up.

 A few days after planting the soaked wheat seeds, they are already sprouting and pushing up the soil.

Day 3 after planting the seeds: They are pushing up the compressed layer of soil.

 The wheat leaves have grown to an inch over the pot and are holding up a disk of soil.

Day 4: The leaves have pushed the soil up a little more.

 The wheat is 2-3 inches above the pot and still suspending the disk of soil.

Day 5: The soil is light and there are a lot of wheat plants, so they continue to lift the soil.

 The grass is now 4-5 inches tall and the disk of soil is on top, but leaning to the side, about to fall off.

Day 6: “Get off me, Soil! – Umph!”

 The disk of soil that was lifted by the grass has fallen to the side of the pot.

Day 7: Phew!

That was so much fun, I tried the same thing with a bunch of bean seeds.

 the top of the soil is rising about a half inch out of the pot.

Bean sprouts pushing…

 the sprouting beans can be seen pushing up the top of the soil, now 1-2 inches over the top of the pot.

…pushing…

 a dozen bean plants are growing out of the pot and pushing the top soil disk to the side.

…and bursting from inside the pot.

This demonstration was pretty easy and impressive. It is a simple activity to illustrate how plants and other living things change their environment to suit their needs (which is a disciplinary core idea in Next Generation Science Standards for kindergarten). I recommend doing it in the classroom or at home, just for fun.

This is just the beginning. I will be sharing the results in a future blog post. But before I do, I would like to make a few points about the nature of science and how scientists work. 

  1. Science is a collection of established facts and ideas about the world, gathered over hundreds of years. It is also the process by which these facts are learned. Science is both “knowing” and “doing.”
  2. Discoveries start when you watch nature and ask questions, as I did in watching spring bulbs come up. Before beginning an experiment, scientists play. They mess around with materials and concoct crazy ideas. They are constantly asking, “I wonder what will happen if I do ___ ?” That is when discoveries actually happen.
  3. Scientists do formal experiments with purpose, hypothesis, procedures, results, and conclusions after they think they have made a discovery. They use the experiment to test their discovery and provide convincing evidence to support it. In some cases, the experiment disproves a fact or idea, which is a different kind of new understanding about the world. 

I have to agree with Boyce Tankersley, the Garden’s director of Living Plant Documentation, who recently wrote “The SciFi Rant.” Those of us who lean toward botany instead of horticulture are more interested in growing plants to yield ideas rather than meals. In my continuing investigation, I have two goals, and neither is to produce anything to eat.

First, I want to determine the strength of sprouting seeds and see how far I can push them. For example, how many bean sprouts will it take to lift a coconut? I want to find a standard way to measure seed strength.

Second, I want to establish a reliable method for experimenting with seed strength so teachers and students can replicate the procedure, modify it as needed, and use it for their own investigations without going through the awkward phase of figuring out the best way to do this.

 a 6 inch square pot is topped with a round plastic lid and a coconut.

Will the mighty beans sprouting under this menacing coconut have the power to lift it off the top edge of a pot? Stay tuned…

I invite you on my journey.
(To be continued.)

©2018 Chicago Botanic Garden and my.chicagobotanic.org

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