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Sunken gardens : a step-by-step guide to planting freshwater aquariums / Karen A. Randall.

New Book Arrivals - Thu, 03/23/2017 - 9:16am
Sunken gardens : a step-by-step guide to planting freshwater aquariums / Karen A. Randall.
Author: Randall, Karen A., author, photographer.
Call Number: SF457.7.R36 2016

Hello, garden bugs : a high-contrast book.

New Book Arrivals - Thu, 03/23/2017 - 9:16am
Hello, garden bugs : a high-contrast book.
Author: Mora, Julissa, author, illustrator.
Call Number: PZ7.1.M673He 2017

Anywhere farm / Phyllis Root ; illustrated by G. Brian Karas.

New Book Arrivals - Thu, 03/23/2017 - 9:16am
Anywhere farm / Phyllis Root ; illustrated by G. Brian Karas.
Author: Root, Phyllis, author.
Call Number: PZ7.1.R667An 2017

The garden photography workshop : tips and techniques for capturing your garden / Andrea Jones.

New Book Arrivals - Thu, 03/23/2017 - 9:16am
The garden photography workshop : tips and techniques for capturing your garden / Andrea Jones.
Author: Jones, Andrea, 1960- author, photographer.
Call Number: TR662.J66 2017

The mole / Kenneth Mellanby.

New Book Arrivals - Thu, 03/23/2017 - 9:16am
The mole / Kenneth Mellanby.
Author: Mellanby, Kenneth, author.
Call Number: QL737.S76M45 1973

Die vom Wegrain wirklich wahre nachrichten von tier- und blumenvolk, von Marga Müller. Bilder von Else Wenz-Vietor.

New Book Arrivals - Thu, 03/23/2017 - 9:16am
Die vom Wegrain wirklich wahre nachrichten von tier- und blumenvolk, von Marga Müller. Bilder von Else Wenz-Vietor.
Author: Müller, Marga, author.
Call Number: PZ33.M85 1940

Haworthia revisited : a revision of the genus / Bruce Bayer.

New Book Arrivals - Thu, 03/23/2017 - 9:16am
Haworthia revisited : a revision of the genus / Bruce Bayer.
Author: Bayer, M. B., author.
Call Number: QK495.L72B39 1999

The flora of Jamaica; a description of the plants of that island, arranged according to the natural orders. / With and appendix, containing an enumeration of the genera according to the Linnaean system, and an essay on the geographical destribution of...

New Book Arrivals - Thu, 03/23/2017 - 9:16am
The flora of Jamaica; a description of the plants of that island, arranged according to the natural orders. / With and appendix, containing an enumeration of the genera according to the Linnaean system, and an essay on the geographical destribution of the species. By James Macfadyen, M.D. Vo. I. Ranunculacea--Leguminosa.
Author: Macfadyen, James, 1800-1850.
Call Number: QK229.M33 1837

The complete garden bird book : how to identify and attract birds to your garden / text by Mark Golley with Stephen Moss ; illustrated by David Daly.

New Book Arrivals - Thu, 03/23/2017 - 9:16am
The complete garden bird book : how to identify and attract birds to your garden / text by Mark Golley with Stephen Moss ; illustrated by David Daly.
Author: Golley, Mark, author.
Call Number: QL676.5.G65 2017

Plant Disease Alert: Boxwood Blight

Garden Blog - Thu, 03/23/2017 - 8:48am

Late last year, a colleague asked me to have a look at a boxwood planting at a residence in Winnetka. He indicated that it was looking poor and dropping some leaves. I have seen boxwood with various problems, so I was already guessing what it could be.

Upon arrival, I noted bare sections that had dropped leaves, but also noted strange black streaks on the stems. I ran a moisture chamber test that revealed pink-colored mycelial growth on the leaves, an indication of Volutella blight (a common disease on boxwood that I have seen many times before). More alarmingly, I saw white mycelial growth on the stems that could be signs of boxwood blight—a serious disease of boxwood that has never been found in Illinois. With this in mind, I expressed a sample to the University of Illinois Plant Clinic for diagnosis. About two weeks later, I received a call from the Illinois Department of Agriculture (IDOA) regarding the sample, and yes…it was positive for boxwood blight.

Boxwood blight photo by Mary Ann Hansen, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Bugwood.org

Boxwood blight photo by Mary Ann Hansen, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Bugwood.org

Since then, boxwood blight has been found in two other locations in Illinois. All have been traced to nursery stock that came from a source that was not in Illinois; this is good. The IDOA is hopeful that these are isolated incidents that can be contained. Later this month, the IDOA will likely issue a “nuisance declaration” for boxwood blight; this will allow them the authority to mandate proper removal of infected boxwood in an effort to stop any spread.

Boxwood blight photo by David L. Clement, University of Maryland, bugwood.org

Boxwood blight photo by David L. Clement, University of Maryland, Bugwood.org

Boxwood blight photo by Mary Ann Hansen, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Bugwood.org

Boxwood blight photo by Mary Ann Hansen, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Bugwood.org

Boxwood blight was first discovered in the United States in 2011. Currently, it has been identified in 18 states, primarily in the east. It is being managed at a state level, with various states having different regulations. Some states require nurseries to practice boxwood blight cleanliness programs to ensure the plants they sell are disease free. Here at the Chicago Botanic Garden, we are developing protocol to monitor incoming plants and to monitor our existing collection.

Now that boxwood blight has been found in Illinois, and because boxwood is such a common landscape planting, I feel we should all have a good understanding of this new pathogen. There is no need to panic, but if you have boxwoods, you should monitor them this growing season. I will briefly review boxwood blight for you, but you can find many great fact sheets online by searching for “boxwood blight.” One fact sheet that I found very comprehensive was titled, “Best Management Practices for Boxwood Blight,” from the Virginia Cooperative Extension. Also, the Garden’s Plant Information Service can help you with questions about boxwood blight, but we ask that you do not bring in samples. Call (847) 835-0972, or email plantinfo@chicagobotanic.org.

Photo by Mary Ann Hansen, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Bugwood.org

Boxwood blight photo by Mary Ann Hansen, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Bugwood.org

Boxwood blight (Calonectria pseudonaviculata) is a serious fungal disease that primarily affects boxwood (Buxus spp.), but can also hit Japanese pachysandra (Pachysandra terminalis), and sweetbox (Sarcococca spp.). Boxwood blight causes leaf spots, stem cankers, and defoliation. The pathogen itself does not kill the plant, but weakens it to a poor state of health, allowing secondary pathogens to kill the plant. The primary means of spread is by movement of contaminated plants, but it can also be spread via pruning tools, clothing, equipment, and contaminated soil/organic matter. The pathogen can survive in soil and organic matter for years and is easily disseminated by water movement.

Management suggestions:

  • Monitor your boxwood (at least one a month). Look for the following:
    • Leaf spots—light or dark brown circular lesions, often with a yellow halo.
    • Stem cankers—dark brown to black cankers on the stem, diamond shaped or as vertical streaks.
    • Defoliation—sections of the plant dropping leaves.
    • If you feel you have found boxwood blight, you should contact the IDA or send a sample to the University of Illinois Plant Clinic for diagnosis. Please do not bring suspect samples to the Garden.
  • Inspect purchased plants carefully before bringing them home.
  • Home care:
    • Plant in locations with good air circulation.
    • Prune to increase air circulation.
    • Sanitize pruning equipment before going from one plant to another. Lysol disinfectant works well.
    • Water at a time of day that the plants will dry quickly.
    • Avoid overhead watering if possible.
    • If desired for a hedge or mass planting, it is best to plant loosely and allow them to grow into each other; do not plant tightly.

If we learn of anything new with boxwood blight in Illinois, we will do a follow-up blog. For now don’t panic; just monitor, monitor, monitor.

The Garden is a member of the Sentinel Plant Network, a group that unites botanic gardens in monitoring and providing education on exotic plant pests and pathogens, and works in partnership with the National Plant Diagnostic Network (NPDN).

If you are a plant and bug person like me, please consider becoming a NPDN First Detector and help be on the lookout for these exotic plant pests and pathogens. The NPDN offers an online training course to become a First Detector at firstdetector.org. It’s free, and upon completion, you even get a printable certificate!

©2017 Chicago Botanic Garden and my.chicagobotanic.org

Skokie Lagoons Birding Trips

Birding Events at the Forest Preserves - Tue, 03/21/2017 - 7:00am

Lingering winter birds and the front-runners of spring migration. Updates: Chicago Audubon Society, chicagoaudubon.org.

The post Skokie Lagoons Birding Trips appeared first on Forest Preserves of Cook County.

Keeping it Simple: Bird Drawing Basics Workshop

Birding Events at the Forest Preserves - Sat, 03/18/2017 - 1:00pm

An introduction to drawing birds using simple shapes, form and flow. Taught by artist Joe Feliciano: horsepuppy.carbonmade.com. For adults. All art materials supplied.

The post Keeping it Simple: Bird Drawing Basics Workshop appeared first on Forest Preserves of Cook County.

Birding Trip at Sand Ridge Nature Center

Birding Events at the Forest Preserves - Sat, 03/18/2017 - 9:00am

Looking for spring migrants. Updates: Fort Dearborn Chapter, Illinois Audubon Society, fortdearbornaudubon.org.

The post Birding Trip at Sand Ridge Nature Center appeared first on Forest Preserves of Cook County.

Timberdoodle Trek

Birding Events at the Forest Preserves - Fri, 03/17/2017 - 6:30pm

Start inside with a short intro then take a walk to observe the male woodcock spiraling upward in the darkening sky then tumbling down.
Registration required.

The post Timberdoodle Trek appeared first on Forest Preserves of Cook County.

Bemis Woods Birding Trip

Birding Events at the Forest Preserves - Wed, 03/15/2017 - 8:00am

Wintering birds, early migrants. Updates: Chicago Audubon Society, chicagoaudubon.org.

The post Bemis Woods Birding Trip appeared first on Forest Preserves of Cook County.

Crane Moon

Birding Events at the Forest Preserves - Sun, 03/12/2017 - 1:00pm

March was known as the Crane Moon by the Native Americans in this area. Come learn about Crabtree’s largest nesting bird and its amazing migratory journeys.

The post Crane Moon appeared first on Forest Preserves of Cook County.

Bird Feeder Watch

Birding Events at the Forest Preserves - Sat, 03/11/2017 - 10:00am

What birds are visiting the feeders this spring? We’ll help you identify our resident and spring migrants and share ways to attract them to your own yard.

The post Bird Feeder Watch appeared first on Forest Preserves of Cook County.

Celebrating Brazilian Orchids: Cattleya coccinea and relatives

Garden Blog - Thu, 03/09/2017 - 8:57am

While we are in the midst of the exquisite Orchid Show, the Garden is already planning a summer of Brazil in the Garden, highlighting the influence of Brazil on gardens, arts and culture, and conservation. This seems like a great opportunity to publicize some Brazilian orchids that have been among my favorites all the years I have grown orchids at home.

 Cattleya coccinea and hybrids from the Wisconsin Orchid Society Show on February 26, 2017.

Cattleya orchid (Cattleya coccinea) and hybrids from the Wisconsin Orchid Society Show on February 26, 2017—my plants!

First, a few facts.

Brazil has one of the highest diversities of orchid species of any country in the world, with more than 2,500 species reported, and no doubt many more undescribed species from the botanically unexplored interior. If you enjoy orchids at all, you have already seen Brazilian orchid species or the hybrids derived from them. Just a few of the well-known orchids that are indigenous to Brazil are many of the Cattleya species as well as many of the former Sophronitis and Laelia species now included in Cattleya; also species from Epidendrum, Maxillaria, Miltonia, Oncidium, Phragmipedium, Stanhopea, and others. The national flower of Brazil—Cattleya purpurata (formerly Laelia purpurata)—is also an orchid.

The native orchids of Brazil are often epiphytes growing on trees and shrubs, but can also be terrestrial, and even lithophytes (growing on rocks). They can be found from hot and humid lowland tropical areas, to seasonally dry and cooler interior regions, to high elevations in cloud forests. The care of Brazilian orchids and their hybrids in cultivation is as varied as the number of species and their habitats, but where they naturally occur provides clues for how to grow them in cultivation. Luckily, the vast orchid literature available often includes information on their culture. 

Which brings us to Cattleya coccinea, the compact—yet brilliant—jewel of my orchid collection.

Cattleya coccinea

 Cattleya coccinea

Cattleya coccinea

Formerly recognized and still more commonly referred to as Sophronitis coccinea, C. coccinea is one of perhaps six to nine species and as many varietal color forms included in the former genus Sophronitis. While all the species are delightful in their own right, C. coccinea is the best known. It has long been grown, line-bred (crossed within the species) to improve it, converted to tetraploids (double the typical number of chromosomes) to produce plants with even larger flowers, and especially used in breeding to impart large bold flowers on compact plants. Literally thousands of orchid hybrids have C. coccinea lurking in their background. But I prefer the species or hybrids that are at least 25 to 50 percent C. coccinea, and so still bear a strong resemblance to the species.

Cattleya coccinea is a diminutive grower, with cylindrical pseudobulbs less than 1 inch tall, each topped by a solitary leaf all of 2 to 3 inches in height. A clue you are giving your C. coccinea sufficient light is when each leaf has a red stripe on top of the mid-vein. Under my growing conditions, C. coccinea can produce flowers any time from November to May, and will often bloom two or three times in succession. One to two flowers are produced per new pseudobulb. The flowers can be from 1 to nearly 3 inches wide in the best forms, dwarfing the plant. Flowers are a brilliant red to orange-red with some yellow and/or orange in the small lip. Look for forms with flat flowers and broad overlapping petals. They are always a draw in bloom. Related species are less frequently encountered. Cattleya cernua (Sophronitis cernua) has much smaller flowers but produces more per growth, is very vigorous, and tolerates warmer summer temperatures. There are yellow-flowered versions of both C. coccinea and C. cernua, but these are very hard to find and are priced accordingly. Cattleya wittigiana is similar to C. coccinea but with attractive rosy-pink flowers instead. It has been put to good use in breeding. Confusingly, C. wittigiana is also known as C. rosea, Sophronitis wittigiana, and Sophrontis rosea. The other species are rarely seen.

 Cattleya-dichroma-(formerly-Sophronitis-bicolor)

Cattleya dichroma (formerly Sophronitis bicolor)

Tips on cultivating Cattleya coccinea

Culture of Cattleya orchids can be demanding. In its relatively high-elevation native habitats in Brazil, C. coccinea is an epiphyte on trees and shrubs, receiving strong light to full sun, high humidity, strong air movement, and cool temperatures. Try to duplicate these conditions in cultivation. I grow mine mostly in New Zealand sphagnum moss in small clay pots, replacing the moss every winter. They can also be mounted on small pieces of cork bark with a bit of sphagnum moss to help retain moisture. Do not repot them in the summer. Cool temperatures are optimal, with nights as low as 45 degrees Fahrenheit (I aim for around 52-degree nights) and day temperatures no higher than 86 degrees in the summer. Constant high relative humidity and excellent air movement are essential. Never allow the roots to dry out for too many days. These are also sensitive to hard water. If you can, water with rainwater if your water quality is suspect. I fertilize mine weekly when in growth with a variety of fertilizers, alternating 15-5-15 Cal Mag with an occasional 30-10-10 acid feed. (Other growers rarely fertilize at all. It is a matter of personal preference and cultural conditions.)

The former Sophronitis species are not for beginning orchid growers. But with attention to their cultural preferences, they can thrive in the hands of experienced orchid growers. I adore them for their interesting foliage, dwarf habits, and their vibrant and glowing flowers that dwarf the plants. Look for their easier-to-grow hybrids as well.

 Cattleya Wild Fire, a hybrid of Cattleya coccinea and Cattleya wittigiana.

Cattleya ‘Wild Fire’, a hybrid of Cattleya coccinea and Cattleya wittigiana

The Chicago Botanic Garden does not have any of the former Sophronitis species in its collections (I’ll work on that), but there is a good chance that at least some of the species, or hybrids from them, will be on display at the Illinois Orchid Society Spring Show, held March 11 and 12 here at the Garden. The IOS show, which is layered on top of the Garden’s Orchid Show, will include numerous exhibits, judging of the best plants, multiple vendors with plants and growing supplies for sale, an information desk, and a repotting station. Also, look for Brazil in the Garden in our many gardens and events this summer.

Be sure to visit!

©2017 Chicago Botanic Garden and my.chicagobotanic.org

Roll Out the Green Carpet: A Star Is Born in the Greenhouse

Garden Blog - Mon, 03/06/2017 - 10:11am

What is old is new again.

The dinosaur of the plant kingdom, a Wollemia pine tree (Wollemia nobilis), has surprised horticulturists at the Chicago Botanic Garden with a burst of promising male and female cones this winter.

In Glencoe, the sole tree spends its winters in the carefully controlled environment of the production greenhouse. In the wild, its relatives are clinging to life on remote sandstone gorges in the Blue Mountains of Australia.

“It is probably the most watched plant in the Garden right now,” said Boyce Tankersley, director of living plant documentation. Little is known about the prehistoric species that is part of a genus dating back 65 million years. The Garden’s specimen is a youthful 8 years old, and is just beginning to show off its unusual characteristics.

“In this case, there is such little information in the literature,” noted Tankersley, who was amazed to see both male and female cones emerging from the tree’s branches earlier this year. “We don’t know enough about this plant to know if it is going to set seed…but at least it is producing cones, which will allow us to try some experiments,” he said. The tree has grown male cones in recent years, but this is the first year it has produced any female cones.

 Wollemia nobilis female cone.

Wollemia nobilis female cone

 Wollemia nobilis male cone.

Wollemia nobilis male cone

Scientists do know that the species that has managed to survive the test of time possesses some unusual adaptations. It can generate new seedlings by dropping specific branches that take root, or it can exchange pollen from male to female cones to generate seed.  

At the Garden, scientists plan to pollinate the tree when the time is right. They will use pollen from the tree itself, and if available, pollen from a tree at another botanic garden. They will also reserve pollen for a potential future exchange.

 Wollemia nobilis in the Heritage Garden in summer.

Find Wollemia nobilis in the Heritage Garden in the summer months.

Trees in the wild population are believed to be closely related to one another. As a result, any seeds they produce have a low level of viability. Only 6 percent or fewer go on to become healthy, mature trees. The species is listed as critically endangered. The urgency to save the pines is accelerated by changes in climate. Their mountain home is experiencing increasingly hotter and drier weather than ever before.

According to Tankersley, there is hope that more diversity may be found within the propagated plants, and that their offspring could lead to a stronger future for the species. However, scientists are only mildly optimistic. “In a world where there is so much that we can’t do anything about, it’s good to have something where you can participate in efforts to keep something from going extinct,” he said. “This plant is not gone; there’s something we might be able to do to help it out.” In addition, the plant may inform the research of paleobotanists who rarely have the opportunity to see a live plant with such historic roots to compare against the fossil record. “In a scientific way, we’ve been looking at the earth in a relatively short period of time,” added Tankersley. “When we find something like this that is very uncommon, everything about it is unknown…it’s sort of a miniature warehouse that we don’t want to lose because in the future, it may be more important than a mere botanical curiosity.”

The horticultural team also takes the cone production as validation that they are meeting the plant’s very particular growing requirements.

The Garden’s Wollemia pine spends its summers in the Australia bed of the Heritage Garden. Tankersley anticipates that it will be back on display this June.

As for the voyage of discovery with this extraordinary plant, he says, it is to be continued…

©2017 Chicago Botanic Garden and my.chicagobotanic.org

Help track blooms now for Project BudBurst

Garden Blog - Sat, 03/04/2017 - 8:48am

In the Chicago region, we have been having record-breaking warm weather: For the first time in 146 years, the National Weather Service documented no measurable snowfall in either January or February. Chicago’s record year is mirrored globally. Scientists from both NASA and NOAA recently released reports showing that 2016 was the hottest year since global temperature tracking began in 1880. If that sounds familiar, it is: It was the third record-breaking warm year in a row. And so far, the warmth is continuing in 2017.

“Is it hot outside?”

Many of us in the United States are experiencing unseasonably warm winters with leaf and flower buds bursting weeks earlier than normal. While these balmy days may be welcomed by those in northern climes (ourselves included!), they may cause problems later in the year, for both natural and agricultural systems. 

In natural areas, we might experience more phenological mismatches. These occur when species that depend on each other do not respond to climate cues in the same way. For instance, hummingbirds and butterflies that overwinter in the tropics and migrate north as the days get longer may arrive to find the plants they depend on for nectar have already finished blooming.

In agricultural systems, fruit production could be harmed in a couple of ways. First, if winters are too short, chilling requirements for flower bud formation may not be met in southern regions (say, for Georgia peaches). In more northern areas, early blooms coaxed out by unseasonable warmth could be killed by a late frost (say, for Michigan cherries). In short: A mild winter and early spring may not be as “peachy” as one might hope.

This is where you come in.

Scientists at the Chicago Botanic Garden and across the country are researching the impacts of these warmer winters on plants and ecosystems, and one challenge in this work is the need for very large, long-term data sets documenting when plants leaf out and bloom. We need your help.

The Chicago Botanic Garden has recently taken over Project BudBurst, a national citizen science project designed so you can help us collect just such data, and in this very warm year, it is more important than ever that we collect as much data as possible.

Three of the most common plants in our area—and earliest to bloom and leaf—are forsythia (Forsythia × intermedia), red maple (Acer rubrum), and Virginia bluebells (Mertensia virginica). When you see that first yellow forsythia bloom, the first leaf on your red maple, or that first bluebell bud open, let us know by contributing to Project BudBurst. It’s easy.

Forsythia (Forsythia x intermedia)

Forsythia (Forsythia × intermedia)

Red maple (Acer rubrum) in bud

Red maple (Acer rubrum) by Plant Image Library [CC BY-SA 2.0], via Wikimedia Commons

Virginia bluebells (Mertensia virginica)

Virginia bluebells (Mertensia virginica)

Visit Project BudBurst
and create an account
and you’re ready to go.

Once you’ve created an account, you can make a single observation on any of our target species.

If you want to make more of a commitment, you can create a site location—your backyard, for example—that will allow you make observations on the same plants throughout the growing season, from budburst to leaf fall.

Your phenology observations—especially in unusual years like this one—can help scientists understand how plants are likely to respond to future climates. And that will help us all adapt to the changes that will come!

 Kay HavensKay Havens, Ph.D., is the Medard and Elizabeth Welch Senior Director, Ecology and Conservation, at the Garden. Her research interests include reproductive ecology and conservation of plant species.

 Jennifer Schwarz Ballard

Jennifer Schwarz Ballard, Ph.D., serves as the vice president of education and community programs for the Garden. In this role, she oversees the Joseph Regenstein, Jr. School of the Chicago Botanic Garden, horticultural therapy, and the Windy City Harvest urban agriculture program.

 

©2017 Chicago Botanic Garden and my.chicagobotanic.org

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