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Bird Conservation Success Story and Birding Trip: Powderhorn

Birding Events at the Forest Preserves - Sat, 08/13/2016 - 8:30am

Walk with Forest Preserves of Cook County, Friends of the Forest Preserves, Calumet Stewardship Initiative and Bird Conservation Network volunteers and staff through recently restored black oak savanna, sand prairies and rich wetlands that have been managed to provide Willow Flycatcher habitat. To register contact: jpbobolink@gmail.com.

The post Bird Conservation Success Story and Birding Trip: Powderhorn appeared first on Forest Preserves of Cook County.

Bird Walk

Birding Events at the Forest Preserves - Sat, 08/13/2016 - 7:30am

Take a bird walk with Chicago Botanic Garden ecologist Jim Steffen.  Meet at the Visitor Center.

The post Bird Walk appeared first on Forest Preserves of Cook County.

Brookfield Zoo Big Year Birding Field Trip

Birding Events at the Forest Preserves - Sat, 08/06/2016 - 7:00am

Bird the grounds at Brookfield Zoo and search for migrants along the Forest Preserve Nature Trail at Swan Lake. Contact team leader James: james.mckinney@czs.org or 708.688.8475. Trips last 2 hours.

The post Brookfield Zoo Big Year Birding Field Trip appeared first on Forest Preserves of Cook County.

Bird of the Month: Great Blue Heron

Birding Events at the Forest Preserves - Sun, 07/31/2016 - 1:00pm

Learn about the life history of this majestic wading bird, which can often be seen fishing in our pond and along the Des Plaines River. Family program.

The post Bird of the Month: Great Blue Heron appeared first on Forest Preserves of Cook County.

Burnham Prairie Big Year Birding Field Trip

Birding Events at the Forest Preserves - Sat, 07/30/2016 - 8:00am

Abundant wading birds, fall shorebirds, resident sparrows. See chicagobirder.org for updates. Walk leader: Carl Giometti, chicagobirder@gmail.com.

The post Burnham Prairie Big Year Birding Field Trip appeared first on Forest Preserves of Cook County.

The Adventure Continues

CLM Internship Blog - Tue, 07/26/2016 - 12:05pm

Hey ya”ll,

As we dive deeper into summer, it is becoming more and more apparent how much progress we’ve been making on our work. We manage to get out and survey a few BLM parcels each week. This sounds impressive but in reality a good portion of each parcel tends to be made of rock cliffs and boulders. But we do what we can and despite accessibility issues we have obtained a lot of data. It became much more obvious during a weeds meeting we had this past week. Our supervisor loaded up ArcMap on the big screen, pulling up areas we had been working in and there were all our polygons points and lines of noxious weeds found in those areas. And while of course it’s not a desirable thing to have so many invasive species, it is good that we seem to be doing well scouting for them. As I’ve mentioned in recent blog posts, some of the areas require a good huff and puff of hiking to reach. Last week was particularly exhausting. We hiked over 20 miles in 3 days climbing up and down hills that sometimes changed in elevation by 1000 feet. The picture below is an example, though it doesn’t do it justice. 20160714_151207

Running along this site was the Okanogan River which we camped next to the week before.

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Not a terrible place to crash for the evening. However, I was kicking myself the whole time for not bringing my fishing pole, apparently this section of the river is excellent salmon fishing… D:
Two weeks ago was also the week our crew became familiar with a highly aggressive invasive, medusahead. This winter annual grass is native to Europe and was first found in Oregon at the beginning of the 20th century. It thrives on range land, spreads quickly, and decomposes slowly, resulting in thick layers of litter covering a large area. This inhibits native plant growth and becomes a great fuel source for a wildfire. It has never been found in the county we work in until this year when someone found an odd looking grass on private property nearby and decided to report it. Sure enough it was confirmed to be medusahead and now federal and state agencies are trying to determine the extent of its infestation in the area. We surveyed a BLM parcel near the area where it was found to see if it was present and fortunately none was found. But first we visited the property where it was found to make sure we knew how to identify it.

20160711_135007

Taeniatherum caput-medusae or medusahead

We’ve kept our eyes peeled since, but luckily it hasn’t been found outside this area. How it got here remains a mystery and will probably stay that way since its seeds can stick to practically anything; clothing, tires, animals, etc. On the plus side, the area we surveyed nearby did have a rewarding view of the Wenatchee valley.

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Next week we plan on having another work camping trip and hitting some spots that I have no doubt will mostly be made of boulders and cliffs. The adventure continues..

Kat

Kōrin moyō / [henshūsha Furuya Kōrin].

New Book Arrivals - Tue, 07/26/2016 - 12:05pm
Kōrin moyō / [henshūsha Furuya Kōrin].
Call Number: NK8884.K9K67 1907

Flower show.

New Book Arrivals - Tue, 07/26/2016 - 12:05pm
Flower show.
Author: Art Institute of Chicago.

Paphiopedilum.

New Book Arrivals - Tue, 07/26/2016 - 12:05pm
Paphiopedilum.
Call Number: HE6185.C62P36 2001

Some drug plants in Florida / by B.V. Christensen.

New Book Arrivals - Tue, 07/26/2016 - 12:05pm
Some drug plants in Florida / by B.V. Christensen.
Author: Christensen, B. V. (Bernard Victor), 1885-1956.
Call Number: QK99.U6C57 1935

Plants for the herb garden : herb gardens, wild flower gardens, rock gardens ...

New Book Arrivals - Tue, 07/26/2016 - 12:05pm
Plants for the herb garden : herb gardens, wild flower gardens, rock gardens ...

Botanical catalog.

New Book Arrivals - Tue, 07/26/2016 - 12:05pm
Botanical catalog.
Author: Indiana Botanic Gardens.
Call Number: GR880.I53 1969

Medicinal and food plants of British Columbia / by Irene Bastow Hudson.

New Book Arrivals - Tue, 07/26/2016 - 12:05pm
Medicinal and food plants of British Columbia / by Irene Bastow Hudson.
Author: Hudson, Irene Bastow.
Call Number: QK99.H84 1950

The useful and ornamental plants in Zanzibar and Pemba. / by R.O. Williams ; with an introduction by E.A.T. Dutton.

New Book Arrivals - Tue, 07/26/2016 - 12:05pm
The useful and ornamental plants in Zanzibar and Pemba. / by R.O. Williams ; with an introduction by E.A.T. Dutton.
Author: Williams, R. O. (Robert Orchard), 1891-1968.
Call Number: SB108.Z3W55 1949

The garden flowers of China / H.L. Li.

New Book Arrivals - Tue, 07/26/2016 - 12:05pm
The garden flowers of China / H.L. Li.
Author: Li, Hui-Lin, 1911-
Call Number: SB404.6.C5L54 1959

The botanical lore of the California Indians : with side lights on historical incidents in California / by John Bruno Romero, "Ha-Ha-St of Tawee."

New Book Arrivals - Tue, 07/26/2016 - 12:05pm
The botanical lore of the California Indians : with side lights on historical incidents in California / by John Bruno Romero, "Ha-Ha-St of Tawee."
Author: Romero, John Bruno, author.
Call Number: QK99.R66 1954

The Gardens' bulletin, Straits Settlements : a journal reflecting the activities of the botanic gardens of the Straits Settlements, published as material is available.

New Book Arrivals - Tue, 07/26/2016 - 12:05pm
The Gardens' bulletin, Straits Settlements : a journal reflecting the activities of the botanic gardens of the Straits Settlements, published as material is available.
Call Number: RC164.G37 1960

Herb journal.

New Book Arrivals - Tue, 07/26/2016 - 12:05pm
Herb journal.

Annual report / The Gardens Trust.

New Book Arrivals - Tue, 07/26/2016 - 12:05pm
Annual report / The Gardens Trust.
Author: Gardens Trust (Great Britain)

“If I could offer you only one tip for the future, sunscreen would be it…

CLM Internship Blog - Tue, 07/26/2016 - 12:03pm

… The long-term benefits of sunscreen have been proved by scientists, whereas the rest of my advice has no basis more reliable than my own meandering experience.

I will dispense this advice now.”

I’m not sure how many of the CLM interns or other people reading this blog are old enough to remember Baz Lurhman’s 1999 hit “Everybody’s Free (To Wear Sunscreen)” or the 1997 commencement speech, written by the Chicago Tribune’s Mary Schmich, that inspired it. If you are unfamiliar with this little piece of 90s pop culture, please go ahead and look it up.

As this is my last blog post of my internship, I have decided to focus on offering some insights and advice for current and future interns. The majority of CLM blog posts focus on the fantastic new people, places, and things that interns are experiencing. This is great! However, as with all social media, the rose-colored glasses people use can block out some of the more challenging aspects of life. So, without further ado:

Wear sunscreen

This advice is solid, no matter where you are located for your internship. And, really, this is good advice for any time you’ll be outside, working or not.

Don’t dwell on other interns’ blog posts

It can be fun to see what everyone else in the program is doing and learning. It can also sometimes seem like other people are receiving more/better opportunities or training than you are. What the blog posts tend not to show are the periods of frustration, stress, loneliness, etc. that everyone experiences. Don’t focus on other people’s internships. Focus on making the most out of your own.

Communication is KEY

I consider this as important as wearing sunscreen. Poor communication skills are the source of many of life’s frustrations, and cause strain on personal and professional relationships. If you are working with other people, make sure everyone is on board with schedules and plans, and that everyone has a chance to contribute. Listen to other people’s concerns, and if you have concerns or frustrations of your own, speak up! No one can help you if you don’t ask for it.

Stay where you are…

…within reason. I’m not saying you shouldn’t take advantage of weekend trips to places fairly close by. I’m saying don’t use your vacation and personal time to keep going home or keep taking trips to meet friends or significant others halfway across the country. You’ll squander your opportunities to discover the places around your internship location and your opportunities to build relationships with your fellow interns and coworkers.

Use your support system

This likely consists mainly of your fellow interns. Many internships are in smaller towns or rural areas, which means your main social options are who you work with. Build relationships with your teammates and support each other. Spend time together and go on adventures. Isolating yourself not only lessens your own experience, but can also leave your fellow interns on their own.

Be aware of expectations vs. reality, and be proactive

Many times things don’t turn out the way we expect them to. Is your project not what you thought it would be? Is your location not as exciting as you’d hoped? That sucks, but you’re going to have to deal with it. Being perpetually negative won’t fix anything. Being proactive will. Start asking around the office to get involved with other activities. Start networking where you can. Opportunities usually exist, but sometimes they require effort.

Take advantage of and appreciate your time here

Whether you are loving your internship or have hit a rough patch, focus on making the most of your time. You are in (probably) a new and unfamiliar place. Appreciate experiencing a different environment. Appreciate experiencing a different cultural region of the country. Appreciate meeting new people. Appreciate experiencing struggles you may not have faced before, and the personal growth that comes from that.

Take advantage of your time here.

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