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International Migratory Bird Day

Birding Events at the Forest Preserves - Sat, 05/12/2018 - 9:00am

Celebrate and learn about one of the most important events in the Americas – bird migration!  Join us for bird hikes, special exhibits, and learn how you can support bird conservation. All ages.

The post International Migratory Bird Day appeared first on Forest Preserves of Cook County.

#BirdThePreserves Big Sit

Birding Events at the Forest Preserves - Sat, 05/12/2018 - 8:00am

Join Forest Preserves staff to sit and watch as many bird species as possible when viewed from a fixed location within a 17-foot circle.

The post #BirdThePreserves Big Sit appeared first on Forest Preserves of Cook County.

LaBagh Woods Bird Walk & Workday

Birding Events at the Forest Preserves - Sun, 04/22/2018 - 7:30am

Find early migrants and join an optional restoration workday afterward. Wear boots. Beginning birders welcome; binoculars available. Updates: chicagobirder.org

The post LaBagh Woods Bird Walk & Workday appeared first on Forest Preserves of Cook County.

Bartel Grassland Bird Walk & Workday

Birding Events at the Forest Preserves - Sat, 04/21/2018 - 8:00am

Enjoy grassland birds, then help restore this large prairie by cutting invasive brush. Leaders: Stephanie Beilke, Chuck Scannell, Teri Valenzuela. For more information, call 312-453-0230.

The post Bartel Grassland Bird Walk & Workday appeared first on Forest Preserves of Cook County.

Camp Pine Woods Bird Walk & Workday

Birding Events at the Forest Preserves - Sat, 04/21/2018 - 7:45am

Explore birds in this new shrubland habitat restoration. Beginning birders welcome; binoculars available. An optional workday may follow; updates: chicagoaudubon.org.

The post Camp Pine Woods Bird Walk & Workday appeared first on Forest Preserves of Cook County.

Friday Bird Hikes

Birding Events at the Forest Preserves - Fri, 04/20/2018 - 8:30am

Catch the migration spirit and join us each Friday for a guided bird hike. If the weather and birds cooperate, join us for another hike at a different forest preserve in the area. Binoculars available. Participants will drive their own vehicles.

The post Friday Bird Hikes appeared first on Forest Preserves of Cook County.

Bird Walks

Join the Crabtree staff to look for spring migrants. Meet in the parking lot.

The post Bird Walks appeared first on Forest Preserves of Cook County.

Build a DIY Native Bee Home

Plant Science and Conservation - Wed, 04/18/2018 - 11:26am

Pollinators are crucial to the health of the planet, helping with everything from the food we eat to the cycle of life. At the free Unearth Science festival this weekend, the Chicago Botanic Garden will celebrate pollinators with activities including a workshop on making native bee homes. We’ve got a sneak peek for you below.

Did you know that native bees are better and more efficient pollinators than honeybees when it comes to fruit trees? Honeybees carry pollen in sacks on their hind legs, which doesn’t always make it to the stigma of the flowers they visit (anthers are where the pollen grains are picked up; stigma is where they are deposited for successful pollination). Mason bees (Osmia lignaria) carry pollen all over their bodies, which means that the pollen has a greater chance of reaching the stigma for proper pollination. One mason bee can pollinate as many flowers as 100 honeybees. 

 Mason bee (Osmia lignaria)

Mason bee (Osmia lignaria)

Mason bees pollinate a wide variety of flowers, in addition to fruit trees, with a particular emphasis on the rose family. They are generalists though, so they pollinate many types of vegetables too. If you are interested in growing fruit trees and vegetables in your yard, you may want to attract and support more mason bees.

Are you avoiding bees because they sting? Another reason to invite mason bees into your yard is that they are nonaggressive. Honeybees and bumblebees may defend their nests if disturbed, so bee skeps—or domed hives—are usually located on larger plots of land, not in typical backyards. Male mason bees do not have stingers, and the females only sting if they are trapped, so there is little reason to fear them.

We asked horticulture program specialist Nancy Clifton for a preview of her workshop at the Unearth Science festival with Northwestern University graduate student Marie Faust. The workshop, Native Bee Homes, is a free event that requires registration. You’ll find instructions for how to make a mason bee home below. Bring your questions about pollinators and other science-related topics to the festival, where dozens of scientists and horticulturists will be happy to answer them.

How to Make a Mason Bee Home

DIY native bee house

DIY native bee house

Supplies you’ll need:

  • Clean, 15-ounce metal can
  • Phragmite reed tubes
    (6 inches long)
  • 2¼-inch-wide bark ribbon
  • Cling floral adhesive (or similar putty tape)
  • Duct tape
    (camouflage blends in well)
  • Scissors
  • Rubber bands

Instructions:

 placing the reeds. They will stick out of the can quite a bit, so you can extend the lip of the can with duct tape around the reed bundle.

Step 1

Fill the metal can with as many reeds as you can tightly pack inside. Ensure the open ends of the reeds are facing out. Use duct tape to encircle the parts of the reeds that are sticking out of the can.

Wrap 3 strips of bark ribbon around the can and extension.

Step 2

Cut three strips of bark ribbon to wrap around the can and the duct-taped extension. Use bits of Cling adhesive to adhere the bark ribbon to the can in three sections, so it is completely covered.

Make a roof with bark ribbon and duct tape.

Step 3

Cut two 8-inch-long pieces of bark ribbon and duct tape them together along the long edge. Place this over the top of your can as a roof. You want to create a small gable that overlaps ½ inch over the end of the tube to keep the reeds dry when it rains.

Place the bee house against a flat surface in a protected area, with a southwest exposure.

Step 4

Use bits of Cling to adhere the roof to the house. If needed, further secure the roof with two rubber bands. Place the completed bee house fairly in a protected area, against a flat surface with a southwest exposure. Placing the house fairly high up ensures that bees will not mingle with people when entering and exiting their new home.

Leave your house out all summer and you should find mason bees filling the tubes with larvae. For information about storing and incubating mason bees for next year, visit seedsavers.org.

Sign up for the free workshop on making native bee homes with horticultural specialist Nancy Clifton and Northwestern University graduate student Marie Faust at the Unearth Science festival, April 20–22, 2018. You’ll make your own native bee home just as described above.

©2018 Chicago Botanic Garden and my.chicagobotanic.org

Build a DIY Native Bee Home

Garden Blog - Wed, 04/18/2018 - 11:26am

Pollinators are crucial to the health of the planet, helping with everything from the food we eat to the cycle of life. At the free Unearth Science festival this weekend, the Chicago Botanic Garden will celebrate pollinators with activities including a workshop on making native bee homes. We’ve got a sneak peek for you below.

Did you know that native bees are better and more efficient pollinators than honeybees when it comes to fruit trees? Honeybees carry pollen in sacks on their hind legs, which doesn’t always make it to the stigma of the flowers they visit (anthers are where the pollen grains are picked up; stigma is where they are deposited for successful pollination). Mason bees (Osmia lignaria) carry pollen all over their bodies, which means that the pollen has a greater chance of reaching the anthers for proper pollination. One mason bee can pollinate as many flowers as 100 honeybees. 

 Mason bee (Osmia lignaria)

Mason bee (Osmia lignaria)

Mason bees pollinate a wide variety of flowers, in addition to fruit trees, with a particular emphasis on the rose family. They are generalists though, so they pollinate many types of vegetables too. If you are interested in growing fruit trees and vegetables in your yard, you may want to attract and support more mason bees.

Are you avoiding bees because they sting? Another reason to invite mason bees into your yard is that they are nonaggressive. Honeybees and bumblebees may defend their nests if disturbed, so bee skeps—or domed hives—are usually located on larger plots of land, not in typical backyards. Male mason bees do not have stingers, and the females only sting if they are trapped, so there is little reason to fear them.

We asked horticulture program specialist Nancy Clifton for a preview of her workshop at the Unearth Science festival with Northwestern University graduate student Marie Faust. The workshop, Native Bee Homes, is a free event that requires registration. You’ll find instructions for how to make a mason bee home below. Bring your questions about pollinators and other science-related topics to the festival, where dozens of scientists and horticulturists will be happy to answer them.

How to Make a Mason Bee Home

DIY native bee house

DIY native bee house

Supplies you’ll need:

  • Clean, 15-ounce metal can
  • Phragmite reed tubes
    (6 inches long)
  • 2¼-inch-wide bark ribbon
  • Cling floral adhesive (or similar putty tape)
  • Duct tape
    (camouflage blends in well)
  • Scissors
  • Rubber bands

Instructions:

 placing the reeds. They will stick out of the can quite a bit, so you can extend the lip of the can with duct tape around the reed bundle.

Step 1

Fill the metal can with as many reeds as you can tightly pack inside. Ensure the open ends of the reeds are facing out. Use duct tape to encircle the parts of the reeds that are sticking out of the can.

Wrap 3 strips of bark ribbon around the can and extension.

Step 2

Cut three strips of bark ribbon to wrap around the can and the duct-taped extension. Use bits of Cling adhesive to adhere the bark ribbon to the can in three sections, so it is completely covered.

Make a roof with bark ribbon and duct tape.

Step 3

Cut two 8-inch-long pieces of bark ribbon and duct tape them together along the long edge. Place this over the top of your can as a roof. You want to create a small gable that overlaps ½ inch over the end of the tube to keep the reeds dry when it rains.

Place the bee house against a flat surface in a protected area, with a southwest exposure.

Step 4

Use bits of Cling to adhere the roof to the house. If needed, further secure the roof with two rubber bands. Place the completed bee house fairly in a protected area, against a flat surface with a southwest exposure. Placing the house fairly high up ensures that bees will not mingle with people when entering and exiting their new home.

Leave your house out all summer and you should find mason bees filling the tubes with larvae. For information about storing and incubating mason bees for next year, visit seedsavers.org.

Sign up for the free workshop on making native bee homes with horticultural specialist Nancy Clifton and Northwestern University graduate student Marie Faust at the Unearth Science festival, April 20–22, 2018. You’ll make your own native bee home just as described above.

©2018 Chicago Botanic Garden and my.chicagobotanic.org

Bird I.D. Canoe Cruise

Birding Events at the Forest Preserves - Wed, 04/18/2018 - 6:30am

For rookie or advanced birders! Increase your identification skills with a morning of birding on the Skokie Lagoons.  Forest Preserves staff will teach paddling instruction as well as provide birding expertise during the program. Limited number of boats.

The post Bird I.D. Canoe Cruise appeared first on Forest Preserves of Cook County.

Darwin and women : a selection of letters / by Samantha Evans ; foreword by Dame Gillian Beer.

New Book Arrivals - Tue, 04/17/2018 - 7:00pm
Darwin and women : a selection of letters / by Samantha Evans ; foreword by Dame Gillian Beer.
Author: Darwin, Charles, 1809-1882, author.
Call Number: QH31.D2D378 2017

Permaculture guide to reed beds : designing, building and planting your treatment wetland system / Féidhlim Harty.

New Book Arrivals - Tue, 04/17/2018 - 7:00pm
Permaculture guide to reed beds : designing, building and planting your treatment wetland system / Féidhlim Harty.
Author: Harty, Féidhlim, author.
Call Number: TD756.5.H37 2017

The landscapes of Anne of Green Gables : the enchanting island that inspired L.M. Montgomery / Catherine Reid.

New Book Arrivals - Tue, 04/17/2018 - 7:00pm
The landscapes of Anne of Green Gables : the enchanting island that inspired L.M. Montgomery / Catherine Reid.
Author: Reid, Catherine, 1955- author.
Call Number: PR9199.3.M6Z865 2018

My colors book / Patricia Mitter.

New Book Arrivals - Tue, 04/17/2018 - 7:00pm
My colors book / Patricia Mitter.
Author: Mitter, Patricia, author, illustrator.
Call Number: QC495.5.M58 2017

My numbers book / Patricia Mitter.

New Book Arrivals - Tue, 04/17/2018 - 7:00pm
My numbers book / Patricia Mitter.
Author: Mitter, Patricia, author, illustrator.
Call Number: QA113.M58 2017

My opposites book / Patricia Mitter.

New Book Arrivals - Tue, 04/17/2018 - 7:00pm
My opposites book / Patricia Mitter.
Author: Mitter, Patricia, author, illustrator.
Call Number: PE1591.M58 2018

Reading the landscape of America / May Theilgaard Watts.

New Book Arrivals - Tue, 04/17/2018 - 7:00pm
Reading the landscape of America / May Theilgaard Watts.
Author: Watts, May Theilgaard.
Call Number: QK115.W37 1975

Tuesday Mornings are for the Birds

Birding Events at the Forest Preserves - Tue, 04/17/2018 - 8:00am

Bring your binoculars and enjoy the spring migration. We’ll visit Sand Ridge’s best birding spots and watch for some colorful warblers.

The post Tuesday Mornings are for the Birds appeared first on Forest Preserves of Cook County.

From Golden Gate to Garden Gate : small works 2017 / American Society of Botanical Artists.

New Book Arrivals - Mon, 04/16/2018 - 7:00pm
From Golden Gate to Garden Gate : small works 2017 / American Society of Botanical Artists.
Author: American Society of Botanical Artists. Meeting.
Call Number: QK98.3.S62 2017

7a. Conferencia mundial de Orquideologá : programa conmemorativo = 7th World Orchid Conference : Souvenr [sic] program / coordinación y dirección, Rodrigo Escobar ; editores asistentes, Juan Felipe Posada [and others] ; traducciones, Rosemary Smith.

New Book Arrivals - Mon, 04/16/2018 - 7:00pm
7a. Conferencia mundial de Orquideologá : programa conmemorativo = 7th World Orchid Conference : Souvenr [sic] program / coordinación y dirección, Rodrigo Escobar ; editores asistentes, Juan Felipe Posada [and others] ; traducciones, Rosemary Smith.
Call Number: QK495.O64W9275 1972

Pages

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