Trees

Our Native Trees and How to Identify Them: A Popular Study of Their Habits and Peculiarities

Author: 
Harriet L. Keeler
Publisher: 
Kent State University Press
Publication Date: 
2005
ISBN: 
0–873–38838–0

paper, 533 p., $22.95

An educator and administrator in the Cleveland, Ohio, public school system from 1871 to 1908, Harriet Keeler was a dedicated amateur botanist who found joy in communicating her love of plants to American readers. Her organizational capabilities, erudite knowledge of literature and language, and ability to converse at a level that would capture her readers’ interest made her volume on native trees a popular guide at the turn of the twentieth century, and a pleasure to read today.

Subjects: 
Volume: 
7
Number: 
2

The Tree Doctor: A Guide to Tree Care and Maintenance

Author: 
Dan Prendergast and Erin Prendergast
Publisher: 
Firefly Books,
Publication Date: 
2003
ISBN: 
1–552–97742–0

paper, 144 p., $19.95

An ideal book for all property owners, this publication contains the latest information on tree culture from a professional arborist. Excellent illustrations and full color photographs make the text easy to understand.

The publication contains more than the usual boilerplate: the authors go into detail on each aspect of tree care from plant selection to plant problems in simplified terms. The section on diagnosing plant problems is clear and concise, yet non–technical.

Subjects: 
Volume: 
7
Number: 
1

Tropical and Subtropical Trees: An Encyclopedia.

Author: 
Margaret Barwick
Publisher: 
Timber Press
Publication Date: 
2004
ISBN: 
0–881–92661–2

cloth, 484 p., $69.95

If you are in a tropical area and are not able to identify the surrounding trees, the answer can easily be found in Timber Press' new comprehensive reference encyclopedia, Tropical and Subtropical Trees by Margaret Barwick.

Volume: 
7
Number: 
1

Trees of New England: A Natural History

Author: 
Charles Fergus
Publisher: 
Globe Pequot Press
Publication Date: 
2005
ISBN: 
0–762–73795–6

paper, 313 p., $16.95

The trees of New England attracted colonists to America, and they still serve as a magnet to many who appreciate their variety. When settlers first sought our shores, the heavily forested landscape indicated wealth in a natural resource that was urgently needed by the mother country. Although many of the old-growth trees have been cut down, naturalist Charles Fergus tells about their natural history from reproduction to their uses by people and animals.

Volume: 
8
Number: 
2

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