John Constable and the Theory of Landscape Painting

John Constable and the Theory of Landscape Painting
Author: 
Ray Lambert
Publisher: 
Cambridge University Press
Publication Date: 
2005
ISBN: 
0–521–82738–8

cloth, 269 p., $80.00

In this scholarly publication, a scholar of nineteenth century British art, Ray Lambert concentrates his studies on the British landscape painter John Constable and his theory of painting. Constable, who worked during the late eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries, was a link between the artistic endeavors of the eighteenth-century masters who sought to achieve the beautiful, sublime, and picturesque in their paintings and the nineteenth century landscape paintings that were based more on theory and realism. The author explores Constable’s theories and compares his imagery with other masterworks of art, using black and white photographs to illustrate inherent design qualities.

Based on the literary style of the work, this book on landscape art is meant for the academic and professional artist, rather than the general reader.

— Marilyn K. Alaimo, garden writer and volunteer, Chicago Botanic Garden

Volume: 
7
Number: 
5