Captured Landscape: The Paradox of the Enclosed Garden

Captured Landscape: The Paradox of the Enclosed Garden
Author: 
Kate Baker
Publisher: 
Routledge
Publication Date: 
2012
ISBN: 
978–0–415–56229–4

paper, 209 pp., $49.95

British architect and educator Kate Baker reviews the relevance of the enclosed garden in modern architecture and landscape design. Walled gardens have been landscape features for centuries; she finds that their long history continues in contemporary landscapes. Using examples from Britain, the Mediterranean, Japan, and South America, the author sets forth her argument that the walled enclosure is an option that designers should consider as a design possibility. The author does an admirable job in this study of the enclosed garden and opportunities for sustainable design. However, in her analyses, she fails to mention the psychological impact of being restricted behind walls that are meant for protection of property and individuals as well as privacy. Plants that are restricted to enclosures do not have the freedom to grow to their full potential.

— Marilyn K. Alaimo, garden writer and volunteer, Chicago Botanic Garden

Volume: 
14
Number: 
4