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See ya later Cedarville

CLM Internship Blog - Tue, 01/19/2016 - 11:57am

Well, today’s my last day in the Modoc. It’s crazy to think that 7 months have passed since my arrival. My first impression of this small isolated town is definitely memorable. I drove into town and the first thing I noticed that the town population was 514. There’s one of everything- one bar, grocery store, gas station….you get the idea. It was a little unnerving to live in such small, isolated, and conservative place but I really enjoyed working in the sagebrush country. The townspeople here are nice and friendly and the people I worked with all very knowledgeable and easy to work with.

This internship was very rewarding. I got to see the beautiful landscapes of Northeastern California as well as Nevada and Oregon and experience real seasons (unusual in other parts of California). Word to the wise: if you end up in Cedarville in the winter time, have a 4×4 or AWD vehicle. It makes life much MUCH easier.

This internship gave me an opportunity to get hands-on field experience in disciplines that I didn’t really know much about. For example, I helped out with evaluating rangeland health by assessing bunchgrass utilization. Before Cedarville, I didn’t have any knowledge about rangeland. Also, I got to work on various projects like flagging juniper trees for cuttings, monitoring vegetation, planting sagebrush seedlings, and doing pika and raptor surveys. Moreover, I got to hone my ID’ing skills for plants and wildlife. I actually got to use the information I learned in school. Ha!

I guess the final advice to future interns is: JUST TRY IT. It may be out of your comfort zone, but once you do it, you’ll look back and be glad you did it. To think that 8 months ago, I was stressing about making a decision about this internship and another job offer. I’m glad to say that I made the right decision and really enjoyed my time here in the Surprise Valley.

Well…I’ll stop rambling now…and end with some cool  and memorable pictures.

2016-01-09 12.15.13

Amanda and I in our cave. At the Lava Beds National Monument

2016-01-03 16.06.58

Sledding up at Cedar Pass on our off day. It’s great that we have a “ski park” only a couple miles away from Cedarville.

2015-10-11 14.12.29

Avenue of the Giants. California is a gorgeous state.

2015-10-09 09.55.40

View of the Pacific Ocean up in Humboldt county

Lunch time with new friends

Lunch time with new friends

Crater Lake National Park

Crater Lake National Park

Final Thoughts from Cedarville, CA

CLM Internship Blog - Tue, 01/19/2016 - 11:55am

My CLM internship in Cedarville, CA has come to an end. It has been a very enjoyable and educational 7 months spend with the BLM Surprise Field Office. Moving to northern California was definitely a change and provided me a great opportunity to learn a lot.

One of the first things that was a major change was the town itself. It is a small town consisting of only 500 people and one of everything….one grocery store, one gas station, one bar, and so on. It took a while to get used to the idea that Wal-Mart was 2 hours away and in a different state. Because of this fact, excursions to the store involved some planning. However, needing to get groceries gave me the perfect opportunity to do some exploring of nearby nature. During 2 separate trips to the store, my co-intern and I were able to explore Lava Beds National Monument and Crater Lake National Park.

Crater Lake National Park

Crater Lake National Park

Another thing that was a major change and an opportunity to learn new skills was the fact that I was now living and working in a whole new ecosystem. Coming from the Midwest to here I had to learn a whole new set of plants. Luckily, I was able to learn the predominant species fairy quickly. It is really neat to see how plants are adapted to living in this area and compare that to how plants in my area adapted to living there. While the 2 ecosystems are vastly different, they each have their own special qualities.

Mountain Sunset

Mountain Sunset

While working in my office I also had a chance to work on a variety of projects.  I had a chance to work on wildlife, botany, archaeology, and range projects. It really was a great opportunity to help narrow down my career goals. It also gave me experience working within the federal government. It helped me to understand the process and why things are done the way they are. This will help me easily transition into another office.

I greatly enjoyed my CLM internship and the experience and knowledge that came with it. I would definitely suggest this internship to anybody thinking about working in the federal government. It is a great way to earn valuable experience, network with professionals in the field, and possibly experience a different ecosystem then they are used to.

Farewell,

AZ

Where I’ve been in the past year

CLM Internship Blog - Tue, 01/19/2016 - 11:52am

Hello world,

Last year about this time, my post was a map of where I’d been in the past year. I couldn’t think of a better idea then, and I can’t think of one now, so here we go again.

I’ve highlighted the counties of the Las Cruces District Office in red. Each of those blue dots is a place where I’ve taken a picture and recorded what plants were there. About a third of those dots are places I visited as part of my CLM internship, the rest are mostly recreational botanizing. I continue to move slowly towards my goal of having been everywhere in southwestern New Mexico, but do not anticipate achieving that goal any time soon. That’s good. If I thought I knew what was going on, I would be wrong and it would be time to move elsewhere. For instance, at this time last year I had visited 174 of the LCDO’s 608 grazing allotments. Now I have visited 250 of them. So, closing in one half-way for that particular metric. In the last few weeks I’ve decided to wander around northwestern Luna County for no particular reason. It’s nice out there.

And, recently, I came across a mysterious Cylindropuntia. I couldn’t identify it, so I sent the pictures out to folks who might. According to Marc Baker, it is Cylindropuntia davisii, a species I had not seen before that has been very rarely recorded in southwestern New Mexico.

It’s kind of an unpleasant little cactus, but interesting. And, repeating a theme from my earlier posts here… you wouldn’t find it unless you’re walking around out there for a while, and why would you do that? Well, why not?

Looking Back

CLM Internship Blog - Tue, 01/19/2016 - 11:51am

Nearly five months ago I began a journey with the CLM internship program with no idea what would be in store for me. Little did I know that I would be a pioneer of something new to the state of Texas. This botany internship is the first to be established with the United States Forest Service in Texas.

I have met many great people from the Caddo-LBJ National Grasslands District office, the Ladybird Wildflower Foundation, and Texas Nature Conservancy. I have seen new sides facets of the conservation that I have previously were unaware off, such as wildland fire fighting.

Accomplishments achieved include the completion of the offices first seed collection, a monarch butterfly survey, and Asclepias survey.

This internship has opened new possibilities and options for the coming days. But for now it is just time to sit back and relax in the moment.

-Keagan

First collection complete and shipped to Bend for cleaning.

First collection complete and shipped to Bend for cleaning.

Escape the Wind Chill with Winter Blooms in the Greenhouses

Garden Blog - Tue, 01/19/2016 - 8:50am

Escape to a warmer climate and enjoy a mini-vacation from Chicago winters in the Greenhouses at the Chicago Botanic Garden. Boyce Tankersley, director of living plant documentation, showed us some of the more unusual plants we will find flowering—or fruiting—in the Greenhouses in January.

Click here to view the video on YouTube.

Discover amazing aloes and euphorbias in the Arid Greenhouse:

  • We have 43 different species of aloes, including: dwala aloe (Aloe chabaudii), hidden foot aloe (Aloe cryptopoda), and bitter aloe (Aloe ferox). The long tubular flowers of aloes are adapted for pollination by sunbirds, the African equivalent of our hummingbirds. The sap of aloe vera is used widely in cosmetics and to treat burns.
  • Our 35 different species of euphorbias are also spectacular during this time period. Look for geographic forms and cultivars of Euphorbia milii as well as the spectacular Masai spurge (Euphorbia neococcinea). Did you know that poinsettias are also in the genus Euphorbia?
  • About to flower for only the second time in 30 years is turquoise puya (Puya alpestris), a bromeliad native to the high, dry deserts of Chile whose turquoise flowers are irresistible to hummingbirds.

 Bitter aloe (Aloe ferox).

Bitter aloe (Aloe ferox)

 Crown-of-thorns (Euphorbia milii).

Crown-of-thorns (Euphorbia milii)

 Turquoise puya (Puya alpestris).

Turquoise puya (Puya alpestris)

The Semitropical Greenhouse is where you will find the following:

  • Paper flower—What appears to be the “flowers” of Bougainvillea ‘Barbara Karst’ and ‘Singapore White’ are actually colorful bracts surrounding the small, white flowers.
  • Dwarf pomegranate (Punica granatum ‘Nana’)—Pomegranates are native to the Middle East and are part of the Biblical Plants collection in the Semitropical Greenhouse.
  • Calamondin orange (× Citrofortunella mitis)—This decorative, small orange is too bitter to be eaten.
  • Ponderosa lemon (Citrus × ponderosa)—Ponderosa lemons are the largest in the world.
 Bougainvillea × buttiana 'Barbara Karst'.

Paper flower (Bougainvillea × buttiana ‘Barbara Karst’)

 Dwarf pomegranate (Punica granatum 'Nana').

Dwarf pomegranate (Punica granatum ‘Nana’)

 Calamondin orange (x Citrofortunella microcarpa).

Calamondin orange (× Citrofortunella microcarpa)

 Ponderosa lemon (Citrus x ponderosa).

Ponderosa lemon (Citrus × ponderosa)

Don’t miss these highlights in the Tropical Greenhouse:

  • “Alice” the titan arum (Amorphophallus titanum) with her magnificent orange fruiting spike. (The fruiting stage does not produce an odor.) The fruits will mature over the next two months to a deep red. In the wilds of Sumatra, ripe fruits are eaten by the rhinocerous hornbill, which spread the seeds.
  • The vining Vanilla planifolia var. variegata is a variegated form of the Central American orchid that produces vanilla beans
  • Cacao (Theobroma cacao)—the pods from this plant are used to make chocolate.  
  • Nodding clerodendrum (Clerodendrum nutans) is among the first of this genus of winter-flowering shrubs and vines to be covered in showy flowers.
  • The elegant white Angraecum Memoria Mark Aldridge orchids with their long nectar tubes signal the start of orchid flowering season.
 Vanilla orchid (Vanilla planifolia).

Vanilla orchid (Vanilla planifolia)

 Cocoa pod (Theobroma cacao).

Cocoa pod (Theobroma cacao)

 Nodding clerodendrum (Clerodendrum nutans).

Nodding clerodendrum (Clerodendrum nutans)

 Angraecum Memoria Mark Aldridge.

Angraecum Memoria Mark Aldridge (A. sesquipedale × A. eburneum ssp. Superbum)

Please note: The Greenhouses and adjacent galleries will have limited access January 25 – February 7; from February 8 – 12, they will be closed in preparation for the Orchid Show, opening February 13, 2016. From February 13 – March 13, the Greenhouses will be open to Orchid Show ticketed visitors only. 

©2016 Chicago Botanic Garden and my.chicagobotanic.org

Prints and the pursuit of knowledge in early modern Europe / edited by Susan Dackerman ; with essays by Susan Dackerman ... [et al.].

New Book Arrivals - Tue, 01/12/2016 - 12:01pm
Prints and the pursuit of knowledge in early modern Europe / edited by Susan Dackerman ; with essays by Susan Dackerman ... [et al.].
Call Number: NE625.P75 2011

Propagating Eden : uses and techniques of nature printing in botany and art : April 3 - July 25, 2010, Wave Hill Glyndor Gallery / organized by International Print Center New York ; curated by Pari Stave & Matthew Zucker.

New Book Arrivals - Tue, 01/12/2016 - 12:01pm
Propagating Eden : uses and techniques of nature printing in botany and art : April 3 - July 25, 2010, Wave Hill Glyndor Gallery / organized by International Print Center New York ; curated by Pari Stave & Matthew Zucker.
Call Number: NE1338.P76 2010

Native plant resource guide Ontario.

New Book Arrivals - Tue, 01/12/2016 - 12:01pm
Native plant resource guide Ontario.
Call Number: QH106.2.O6N38 2011

Wildflowers of Shenandoah National Park : a pocket field guide / Ann and Rob Simpson.

New Book Arrivals - Tue, 01/12/2016 - 12:01pm
Wildflowers of Shenandoah National Park : a pocket field guide / Ann and Rob Simpson.
Author: Simpson, Ann Cary.
Call Number: QK191.S56 2011

Field guide to the rare plants of Washington / edited by Pamela Camp & John G. Gamon ; with the assistance of Joseph Arnett ... [et al.].

New Book Arrivals - Tue, 01/12/2016 - 12:01pm
Field guide to the rare plants of Washington / edited by Pamela Camp & John G. Gamon ; with the assistance of Joseph Arnett ... [et al.].
Call Number: QK86.U6F528 2011

International Garden Photographer of the Year : collection four.

New Book Arrivals - Tue, 01/12/2016 - 12:01pm
International Garden Photographer of the Year : collection four.
Call Number: TR662.I58 2010

Plants as persons : a philosophical botany / Matthew Hall.

New Book Arrivals - Tue, 01/12/2016 - 12:01pm
Plants as persons : a philosophical botany / Matthew Hall.
Author: Hall, Matthew, 1980-
Call Number: QK46.H35 2011

The book of fungi : a life-size guide to six hundred species from around the world / Peter Roberts and Shelley Evans.

New Book Arrivals - Tue, 01/12/2016 - 12:01pm
The book of fungi : a life-size guide to six hundred species from around the world / Peter Roberts and Shelley Evans.
Author: Roberts, Peter, 1950 Mar. 27-
Call Number: QK603.R63 2011

The complete guide to saving seeds : 322 vegetables, herbs, flowers, fruits, trees, and shrubs / Robert Gough and Cheryl Moore-Gough.

New Book Arrivals - Tue, 01/12/2016 - 12:01pm
The complete guide to saving seeds : 322 vegetables, herbs, flowers, fruits, trees, and shrubs / Robert Gough and Cheryl Moore-Gough.
Author: Gough, Robert E. (Robert Edward)
Call Number: SB118.3.G68 2011

Timeless landscape design : the four-part master plan / Mary Palmer Dargan, Hugh Graham Dargan.

New Book Arrivals - Tue, 01/12/2016 - 12:01pm
Timeless landscape design : the four-part master plan / Mary Palmer Dargan, Hugh Graham Dargan.
Author: Dargan, Mary Palmer.
Call Number: SB473.D373 2007

Low-key genius : the life and work of landscape-gardener, O.C. Simonds / Barbara Geiger.

New Book Arrivals - Tue, 01/12/2016 - 12:01pm
Low-key genius : the life and work of landscape-gardener, O.C. Simonds / Barbara Geiger.
Author: Geiger, Barbara.
Call Number: SB470.S56G45 2011

Lithops : Lithops werneri, Lithops fulviceps, Lithops vallis-mariae, Lithops optica, Lithops ruschiorum, Lithops hermetica, Lithops bromfieldii.

New Book Arrivals - Tue, 01/12/2016 - 12:01pm
Lithops : Lithops werneri, Lithops fulviceps, Lithops vallis-mariae, Lithops optica, Lithops ruschiorum, Lithops hermetica, Lithops bromfieldii.
Call Number: QK495.A32L58 2010

Flower show and judging guide / [Ruth Cox Crocker, editor.].

New Book Arrivals - Tue, 01/12/2016 - 12:01pm
Flower show and judging guide / [Ruth Cox Crocker, editor.].
Author: Garden Club of America.

[60] vleesetende planten uit de Hortus botanicus Leiden / André Schuiteman ; foto's door Jan Meijvogel, André Schuiteman, Art Vogel ; tekening, Shirley Duivenvoorde.

New Book Arrivals - Tue, 01/12/2016 - 12:01pm
[60] vleesetende planten uit de Hortus botanicus Leiden / André Schuiteman ; foto's door Jan Meijvogel, André Schuiteman, Art Vogel ; tekening, Shirley Duivenvoorde.
Author: Schuiteman, André.
Call Number: QK917.S59 2010

Monographic plant systematics : fundamental assessment of plant biodiversity / edited by Tod F. Stuessy and H. Walter Lack.

New Book Arrivals - Tue, 01/12/2016 - 12:01pm
Monographic plant systematics : fundamental assessment of plant biodiversity / edited by Tod F. Stuessy and H. Walter Lack.
Call Number: QK14.5.M66 2011

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